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Thread: conservatory floor

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    conservatory floor

    can anyone suggest the best way to fit a raised floor in a conservatory. have just had one built and at present there is a drop to the concrete floor or one brick down out of the old patio doors. i would prefer it so that the floor is just below the wooden frame of the patio doors. does that make sense. if there is not an easy way can i just lay laminate flooring straight on top of the concrete.

    cheers

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    Maybe tell the contractor that did it to raise the floor? If I payed for something to be done I would want it done to spec.
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    Well there is no reason to say that having a drop down in to the conservatory is out of spec.


    I'm afraid Ive never done any of that modern laminate flooring before but a normal planked floor on joists would be simple enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turkster
    Well there is no reason to say that having a drop down in to the conservatory is out of spec.

    I would have said so if that is not the way he wants it.
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    What you want is a bit of self-levelling scree...

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    the contractor thats doing it is a builder friend of mine. the reason that hes not doing it straight away is because i couldnt afford it straight away, and as it is hes doing a the job very cheaply for me. hes supplied a conservatory (new ex demo model from wickes) fitted it, has built me a fence and gate and is reflagging the patio around the conservatory and flattening and turfing the garden as it was left as a building plot all for £2500.

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    tee pee- not sure on self leveling as there are ventilation bricks that would be covered. there are tow bricks on the house that now vent into the conservatory so would have to be someway that would leave them uncovered, i think is that right

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    No, don't worry about it. They are for underfloor ventilation to the outside, since you now have a conservatory there they are already unused, so don't worry about blocking them up. I assume there are other bricks around the outside of your house? If so, then they will still do the job.

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    ok cheers i thought it would have to be some sort of wooden framework to raise it up. how does the self leveling stuff work and how much is it. would i need anything else to lay laminated flooring on it

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    Well you might find that it would use quite a lot of scree if your planning on bringing it up 3 or 4 inches. Hope you like mixing cement

    Wooden joists would probably be better if your worried about damp etc. It leaves a nice area underneath for ventillation. Saying that most laminated floors these days seem to be laid direct on the concrete subfloor.

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    You would have to start by using concrete to raise the floor to the desired level. The self-leveling scree goes on top of this, and basically provides you with a smooth, level cement floor. Your laminate goes on top of this, I think it's normally stuck on with a mastick. The real benefit of this type of floor over using joists is the lack of flexibility. You could lay ceramic or stone tiles on top of the scree very easily and cheaply, while if you have joists underneath this is much harder.

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    its one brick height to be raised. the base at present is concrete. so id have to use concrete first and then the scree and then laminate. sounds a long winded way. is there no other way such as what i suggested about making a wooden frame and with joists with some sort of sheet of wood over and then laminate or tile that????

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    as a side thought if i decide that its too much hassle to bring it up one brick height could i just lay the laminate on the concrete base as is or use tiles.

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    How long is it going to take to make a solid timber frame? Unless you do a very good (and time consuming) job it will creak underfoot, especially as it seasons.

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    I agree with TeePee as making a solid enough timber frame work for laminated flooring or tiles would be very time consuming and almost certain to creak. I was thinking more of a traditional boarded floor on joists but this would probably be more expensive than laminate.

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    umm ok so the only option is to concrete up to the required height and then laminate. i think i may just laminate on the level that its on now possibly. out of curiousty how much would you think it would cost to concrete up one brick height. am i also write in thinking that couldnt laminate over it straight away and the concrete needs to cure for a month

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