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Thread: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

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    Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Supporting upcoming Comet Lake and Ice Lake CPUs.
    Read more.

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    I am just planning a new PC at the moment (gave up waiting for the next big x years ago) but one thing is for sure I will never, ever... EVER buy any product that has anything to do.. even by association... ATI.. or any product made by, thought about, or even looked at my anyone that thought that the ATI radeon or the Rage 128 before that, were ever any good what-so-ever!

    I know it's irrational, I know that I am normally the guy rolling his eyes at some of the irrational comments on these forums... but I have been burned too many times by both ATI and AMD and I refuse to take the risk again and feel like a mug....again.

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by SciFi View Post
    I am just planning a new PC at the moment (gave up waiting for the next big x years ago) but one thing is for sure I will never, ever... EVER buy any product that has anything to do.. even by association... ATI.. or any product made by, thought about, or even looked at my anyone that thought that the ATI radeon or the Rage 128 before that, were ever any good what-so-ever!

    I know it's irrational, I know that I am normally the guy rolling his eyes at some of the irrational comments on these forums... but I have been burned too many times by both ATI and AMD and I refuse to take the risk again and feel like a mug....again.
    There have been some bad products over the years but also some crackers.

    Intel and Nvidia aren't immune to that either (P4's anyone!?). Just do some research before buying anything, check reviews and get the best in your price range at the time regardless of AMD or Intel / Nvidia.

    Intel: Another day another CPU socket / chipset

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by SciFi View Post
    I am just planning a new PC at the moment (gave up waiting for the next big x years ago) but one thing is for sure I will never, ever... EVER buy any product that has anything to do.. even by association... ATI.. or any product made by, thought about, or even looked at my anyone that thought that the ATI radeon or the Rage 128 before that, were ever any good what-so-ever!

    I know it's irrational, I know that I am normally the guy rolling his eyes at some of the irrational comments on these forums... but I have been burned too many times by both ATI and AMD and I refuse to take the risk again and feel like a mug....again.
    You know it's irrational yet you persist? Interesting.

    You get the right tool for your budget and your task, if money is less of an object then you can't go wrong with Intel. But then again, apart from architecture specific optimisations and OS changes, Ryzen has and is doing the job very well.

    But it is each individuals perogative to go with what they know but if you were burnt as long ago as to differentiate ATI and AMD then is that still a valid issue?

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by Tabbykatze View Post
    ..., if money is less of an object then you can't go wrong with Intel.
    Unless you run a workload where the speculative execution countermeasures tank performance. Intel's defect lists with their CPUs is very long, I never understood how they get regarded as the quality option.

    But hey, I'm triggered by the name Seagate, so I can't say much

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by Tabbykatze View Post
    You know it's irrational yet you persist? Interesting.

    You get the right tool for your budget and your task, if money is less of an object then you can't go wrong with Intel. But then again, apart from architecture specific optimisations and OS changes, Ryzen has and is doing the job very well.

    But it is each individuals perogative to go with what they know but if you were burnt as long ago as to differentiate ATI and AMD then is that still a valid issue?
    I know! I know! I did look at the 3rd gen Ryzen platform, I really did but I then head down the mental rabbit hole of “ok so if I go amd should I do the same for GPU?” I jumped to AMD back in the day when the P3’s were a joke and moved to the AthlonXP which was indeed an awesome chip coming back to Intel for the P4’s. I did run a pair of Radeon GPU’s on that platform but the drivers were just never any good at all, could never play what I wanted without days of reading and finding community modded drivers etc.

    Moved back to the green team for the GeForce 6 generation if I recall.

    Been Blue / Green ever since and I just never have compatibility issues with anything.. If i could Truly be convinced that all that is a thing of the past I would look again but I read about needing patches or fixes to the OS for the Ryzens to work at their best.

    Is this not the case? Am I being paranoid?

    Currently planning on replacing the 7700k + SLI 1080Ti setup with 9900k + 2080Ti SLi.. Kind of like Apple Tax, just refresh and sell to reduce the upgrade cost..

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    I don't really get why people are that upset by Intel's product revisions, I PERSONALLY upgrade my CPU every 4-5 years and I really don't care much about having to get another mobo when I get a new CPU.

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by will19565 View Post
    ... I PERSONALLY upgrade my CPU every 4-5 years and I really don't care much about having to get another mobo when I get a new CPU.
    I'm intrigued that you're sufficiently aware of the personal nature of this question to emphasise the 'personally', but you still question why it bothers other people?!

    I suspect you kind of do get why people get upset ... but I like hearing myself talk, so:

    There are (iirc) currently four functional desktop PCs in my house. One isn't upgradeable, but of the three that are, two have had CPU upgrades, both to a newer generation of CPU than the original.

    The balance here is between rate of change and the level you buy at. If things change slowly, and you buy at the top end anyway, then there's not much difference - this had been the situation for i7 owners between 2009 and 2017.

    If things are changing quickly, if you buy at a lower level anyway, or ideally both, then platform compatibility becomes important. One of my upgraded systems is a socket AM2+ board that I bought with an entry-level Athlon X2. It made a competent workhorse computer at a time of rapid change - within three years AMD had released the Athlon II range with up to 4 cores, and while they had a new socket (AM3) with more features, the backward compatibility meant I had a nice cheap upgrade to 3 or 4 cores available. Why buy a new system when I have a perfectly adequate mobo, memory, etc?

    That's what's happening now - after almost 8 years of near stagnation, competition is driving rapid change. If you bought in late 2017 - 8C Ryzen or 6C i7 - you've already got a higher core count CPU available to drop in your system. By changing the socket for their next generation, Intel are freezing the upgrade path again. If I'd just bought an 8C i9 and a new mobo etc, I'd be pretty miffed that Intel were planning to make it obsolete already...

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by scaryjim View Post
    There are (iirc) currently four functional desktop PCs in my house. One isn't upgradeable, but of the three that are, two have had CPU upgrades, both to a newer generation of CPU than the original.
    6 desktops, seven if you count the spare, and a few old laptops and tablets PCs here.

    I like that if there is a problem with one of the house PCs then if it is AMD based I can probably (I have one FM2 socket system in use, pah) swap components with another PC to diagnose what is wrong. None of my Intel kit is interchangable.

    The only thing stopping me from adopting AM4 wholesale (like I did for AM2/AM3 at one point) is the possibility of DDR5 ram creating an AM5 socket. Now it looks like DDR5 isn't going to be available to consumers until 2020 so I'm starting to wonder if AMD's original roadmap will need to be thrown out and Zen 3 will end up on AM4 still. Certainly I expect 2020 will see a Zen 2+ refresh on AM4.

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Strange mix here... of processors that is!
    New machine is a Ryzen 2600 build and a corsair nvme ssd. Into Win 10 is say 6 secs is good enough for me. Few issues to start with that were fixed by a BIOS update. Rock solid now. 6c 12t for around £300 with some bits being re-used

    Now to get the same intel performance would have been more like £500 so nearly double and the Ryzen is a 65 watt part was enough reasons to discount Intel outright. Throw in the biggest pita is an Intel system right now and I'm fighting hard to ditch it and go Ryzen for that as well
    Old puter - still good enuff till I save some pennies!

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    Re: Gigabyte provides glimpse into Intel 400-series chipsets

    Quote Originally Posted by scaryjim View Post
    By changing the socket for their next generation, Intel are freezing the upgrade path again. If I'd just bought an 8C i9 and a new mobo etc, I'd be pretty miffed that Intel were planning to make it obsolete already...
    This is what annoys me about Intel, the constant socket changes making what is now becoming one of the most expensive parts obsolete (depending on needs). I think AMD have been pretty consistent with the AM4 / Ryzen platform, certainly not perfect but far better than Intel in regards to an upgrade path depending on which motherboard you purchased.

    Just seems that Intel need to design their sockets with some redundancy built in for future chip iterations, with specific specifications for motherboard manufacturers to follow in terms of power delivery availability etc. My last two builds were Intel and AMD, the AMD system has a likely upgrade path, my Intel one will become obsolete with the next generation.

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