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Thread: Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

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    Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

    Will be developing the tech for use in data centres first. Tests show up to 20°C improvement.
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    Re: Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

    would not mind that, but also keep in mind for the consumer those systems can go lethal if not handled well... like a pressure boiler out of control scenario, however I could see some good possible consumer ideas that would not cost and arm and a leg and with possible lesser violent fluids, and maybe with it dropping lets say CPU temp to constant 20C and GPU to below 40C on max workload? could see the benefits from it likewise heavier OC's as well, even stable.

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    Re: Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

    Quote Originally Posted by QuorTek View Post
    however I could see some good possible consumer ideas that would not cost and arm and a leg
    More likely cost an arm and two legs, aimed squarely at dedicated and well-off overclockers.

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    Re: Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

    Surprised that Asetek aren't providing the new solution in the first place. I remember their Vapochill XE PC cases from the 2000's providing phase changing based cooling for the consumer market, with drool worthy and highly dodgy sub-ambient temperatures that could even tame a NetBurst P4.

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    Re: Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

    That pump's in the wrong place for a traditional pumped chase change cooling system (i.e. like the one in your fridge) - either this is a normal heat pump with a bad diagram (which wouldn't be a bad choice for the server applications they're targeting), or a roided AIO.

    It looks like a good approach, the pump will give you flexibility in mounting while only needing similar power levels as a traditional AIO pump (since it's just moving fluid, not making the fluid change phase). It also means no worries about sub-ambient cooling

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    Re: Gigabyte works with Incooling for phase change cooled systems

    Quote Originally Posted by QuorTek View Post
    would not mind that, but also keep in mind for the consumer those systems can go lethal if not handled well... like a pressure boiler out of control scenario, however I could see some good possible consumer ideas that would not cost and arm and a leg and with possible lesser violent fluids, and maybe with it dropping lets say CPU temp to constant 20C and GPU to below 40C on max workload? could see the benefits from it likewise heavier OC's as well, even stable.
    I'd be more worried about the toxic refrigerant leaking than an explosion.

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