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Thread: City-wide WiFi proves controversial

  1. #1
    HEXUS webmaster Steve's Avatar
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    City-wide WiFi proves controversial

    The BBC has a piece on a scheme currently under development, which will see the city of Philadelphia turned into a giant WiFi hotspot. It'll cost citizens $10 or $20 depending on their income, but the prospect of cheap city-wide Internet access is making telephone providers more than a little edgy.
    Verizon lost its fight in Philadelphia but has succeeded in getting the law changed in the rest of the state.

    Essentially it has become almost impossible for any other community to set up its own wi-fi system.

    Several other states have also enacted similar bans, often supported by local politicians who have connections to telecommunications corporations.
    [BBC News]
    Last edited by Bob Crabtree; 05-12-2005 at 01:21 PM.
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    Senior Member Workaholic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve
    The BBC has a piece on a scheme currently under development, which will see the city of Philadelphia turned into a giant WiFi hotspot. It'll cost citizens $10 or $20 depending on their income, but the prospect of cheap city-wide Internet access is making telephone providers more than a little edgy.[BBC News]
    Is that $10-£20 per citizen and for how long? life? a month?
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    radix lecti dave87's Avatar
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    Great idea if they can get around the legal wranglings, as its effectively anti-competitive. Would have been better to put the contract out to tender, and then those with the best package gets the contract, with the government setting the fees. Called PPP, but might actually work in this case (didn't with the rail network though )

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    Companies like Verizon are just scared that people are suddenly going to wake up and release that in theory it would enable you to make a call to anywhere in the world at any time for any length of time for completely free given the coverage. Mobile phone networks will start thinking of reasons it should be illegal soon enough as well if there is enough wireless coverage.

    If someone can create an awesomely simply but functional and easy to use, multiplatform VOIP program and there are enough wireless networks like this, why would we need phone companies or mobile phone companies ever again?

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    Dianeal/Extraneal/Physioneal hoodmeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benji
    If someone can create an awesomely simply but functional and easy to use, multiplatform VOIP program and there are enough wireless networks like this, why would we need phone companies or mobile phone companies ever again?
    Agree to a certain extent, but I think there'd have to be a loooonnggg transition period, where the two work togethor. I say this as, unless something drastic changes, there's gonna be a whole bunch of places where it's infinitely cheaper to get sattelite coverage than WiFi coverage.

    As far as Philadelphia is concerned, I think it's a fantastic idea. As long as the network can handle the traffic, I really like it. Am a little put out by the bans, though ~ although I guess it's to be expected

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