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Thread: Corsair One Pro

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    Corsair One Pro

    Corsair's take on the future of gaming PCs.
    Read more.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Nice, like it alot but only including 2400Mhz DDR4 is a bit mean of them.

    In some titles (Fallout 4, Witcher 3 for example) RAM running at 3000Mhz or 3200Mhz can give quite a substantial boost to frame rates, another 10fps or so over the slower stuff, that's a free GPU overclock without adding to temperatures in such a small case.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    One of the first pre built small form factor gaming rigs I've seen that I actually like, the fact that the GPU is water cooled is also a big plus. Personally I like having self-built huge behemoths due to pricing and cooling, but if I was in the market for this type of rig then this might just be the one! Very impressed in all honesty.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    It's a good first try, however this seems more suited for the plug n play crowd - that means TV hook up, and that means 4K, which, while this card can do (and thanks to GeForce Experience, is easy to find the right settings for), it will struggle in only a few years.

    I'd like to see the next model with a 1080Ti, something like that the home user would get 5 years out of, easy.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    "A very pertinent case in point is our standard gaming test system, comprising an overclocked Core i7 chip, 32GB of RAM, dual SSDs and, of course, a premium graphics card. If built with due care and attention, a PC featuring a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti consumes less than 300W at the wall when gaming at 4K. And it's quiet into the bargain, too."

    Oh indeed, if we look back to the hexus reviews of 2007 we see those terrible 8800GTX systems consuming...

    293W:
    http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/graphics/8687-his-amd-ati-radeon-hd-2900-xt/?page=10


    Idle power consumption has improved, performance in lower power envelopes had improved and cooling has improved. Gaming power consumption remains very high, extraordinarily so when the average computer these days uses about 10W.

    Unfortunately it's in nVidia's interest to keep power consumption high. If they dropped the top of the range chip down to 50W they'd be competing in the same power envelope as Intel's integrated graphics. Great for us, great for the environment, but risky for nVidia as a company.

    I'm not quite so clear on what the incentive is for developers to keep requiring so much power. Presumably prettier games sell better?

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by EndlessWaves View Post
    "A very pertinent case in point is our standard gaming test system, comprising an overclocked Core i7 chip, 32GB of RAM, dual SSDs and, of course, a premium graphics card. If built with due care and attention, a PC featuring a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti consumes less than 300W at the wall when gaming at 4K. And it's quiet into the bargain, too."

    Oh indeed, if we look back to the hexus reviews of 2007 we see those terrible 8800GTX systems consuming...

    293W:
    http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/graphi...00-xt/?page=10


    Idle power consumption has improved, performance in lower power envelopes had improved and cooling has improved. Gaming power consumption remains very high, extraordinarily so when the average computer these days uses about 10W.

    Unfortunately it's in nVidia's interest to keep power consumption high. If they dropped the top of the range chip down to 50W they'd be competing in the same power envelope as Intel's integrated graphics. Great for us, great for the environment, but risky for nVidia as a company.

    I'm not quite so clear on what the incentive is for developers to keep requiring so much power. Presumably prettier games sell better?
    It feels like you are completely missing the point. They're not avoiding dropping power usage to stop competition, they're using as much power as possible to squeeze out the maximum performance.

    Sure power usage is kinda the same for the graphics cards, but look how much more performance we're getting! GPU has always been about performance, if you want a low power solution, they are out there, but that's not the point of them, it's to make things purdy and do it well.

    EDIT: Also, I think you're massively overstating the overall power used, saving 50w is gonna do exactly jack squat diddly for us or the environment

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    If I was going to spend that much I'd build my own and better.
    I think they totally missed the point + a lot of the parts are cheap end for that kind of money.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Now this is what pre-built systems should be! It's a shame they didn't send the 1080ti equipped version, if they could beat aftermarket 1080ti's to market then they could easily claim to have the most powerful single GPU ever.

    Quote Originally Posted by EndlessWaves View Post
    "A very pertinent case in point is our standard gaming test system, comprising an overclocked Core i7 chip, 32GB of RAM, dual SSDs and, of course, a premium graphics card. If built with due care and attention, a PC featuring a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti consumes less than 300W at the wall when gaming at 4K. And it's quiet into the bargain, too."

    Oh indeed, if we look back to the hexus reviews of 2007 we see those terrible 8800GTX systems consuming...

    293W:
    http://hexus.net/tech/reviews/graphi...00-xt/?page=10


    Idle power consumption has improved, performance in lower power envelopes had improved and cooling has improved. Gaming power consumption remains very high, extraordinarily so when the average computer these days uses about 10W.

    Unfortunately it's in nVidia's interest to keep power consumption high. If they dropped the top of the range chip down to 50W they'd be competing in the same power envelope as Intel's integrated graphics. Great for us, great for the environment, but risky for nVidia as a company.

    I'm not quite so clear on what the incentive is for developers to keep requiring so much power. Presumably prettier games sell better?
    It'd be nice if intel tried to split off a roided up version of their graphics processor to compete with Nvidia and AMD, nothing's stopping them doing it. It'd probably make more financial sense than the atom line too

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by Tunnah View Post
    EDIT: Also, I think you're massively overstating the overall power used, saving 50w is gonna do exactly jack squat diddly for us or the environment
    I do believe what EndlessWaves actually said was dropping the top of the range card down to 50W not from 267W (Reference 1080Ti) or 293W (Asus 1080Ti, both from TPU who measure the card not the system) down to 217W or 243W:
    Quote Originally Posted by EndlessWaves View Post
    If they dropped the top of the range chip down to 50W they'd be competing in the same power envelope as Intel's integrated graphics.
    As for equipping this with a more powerful card, like you suggested:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tunnah View Post
    I'd like to see the next model with a 1080Ti, something like that the home user would get 5 years out of, easy.
    Well, (again taking W1zzard's figures from TPU) the 1080 is 184W while the 1080Ti is 267W and dispensing an extra 80W+ in such a small case might be a problem.

    Actually, now that I think of it: while it is nice of sites like TPU to measure the card on its own so that people can work out how much of their PSU's power budget it takes, it doesn't tell you the whole story about the required cooling as if a card used 250W and is powered by a 90% efficient PSU it will draw 278W from the wall and the extra 18W wasted by the PSU have to extracted from the case too.

    On the other hand, Hexus only measured 44W extra for the ref 1080Ti vs their EVGA 1080:

    So while the good thing about this Corsair One Pro versus something like the MSI Nightblade is that takes standard desktop parts, I would imagine replacing the 1080 with that Inno3D iChill 1080 Ti would be asking for trouble, or at the very least push the noise up hugely.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by Xlucine View Post
    It'd be nice if intel tried to split off a roided up version of their graphics processor to compete with Nvidia and AMD, nothing's stopping them doing it. It'd probably make more financial sense than the atom line too
    Well, Larrabee was mostly a $1billion* disaster for Intel. Okay Knights Landing is based on that but so far that hasn't really sold that well AFAIK.
    And anyway, Intel's biggest problem with their IGP is that their drivers never get updated or even support all the features the hardware is touted as having. The other problem is that in terms of perf/mm or more importantly perf/transistors (easier to mask as Intel are 14nm and so far all AMD APUs are on 28nm), I don't think they do that well although the eDRAM in Iris Pro is quite a good concept. I would be interested in someone doing an efficiency comparison of Intel Gen9 (Skylake) vs something like Polaris 12 or GP107. Did find this forum post estimating Skylake GT4 at 234² with about 168mm² being the IGP:
    https://techreport.com/forums/viewto...17799#p1304272
    Recall that a regular quad-core Skylake is confirmed to be 122.4 mm^2. So this chip, which is pretty much regular quad-core Skylake + bigger IGP is coming in at about 112 mm^2 bigger than regular desktop Skylake. Now, the GT4 IGP in these big Skylakes is supposed to be triple [72 EUs] the size of the 24 EU IGP in regular desktop Skylake. So, doing a little comparative analysis, the marginal 112 mm^2 represents twice the size of the IGP in regular Skylake -- or -- the regular IGP in Skylake is 56 mm^2. Out of a 122.4 mm^2 die, that's 56 / 122.4 = 0.457 ~= 46% of the die size going to the IGP. Put another way, regular Skylake sans any GPU but still including cache + PCIe + memory controller would be a 66.4 mm^2 chip... not very big compared to many smartphone SoCs, much less larger CPUs from the old days!
    The Wikipedia lists quad-core GT2 Skylake at 1.75 billion transistors and 46% of that is 0.8 billion but more telling GT4 is about three times that size would be ~2.4 billion which is more than GTX 750 (the closest recent GPU I could find).
    But after all that, I am not really sure how that compares to Nvidia or AMD in terms of perf/transistors. Memory bandwidth is big factor and also since GPUs are so easily parallelized it always possible to go wide and slow to get better perf/watt.

    EDIT: Oops forgot about the * above: what I meant to say is that the estimate for Larrabee is $1billion but like the total lost in mobile or similar, Intel are not really that keen to give the exact numbers so give as little as the shareholders and SEC will let them get away with.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    I have an SF450 myself - I have not heard of an SF400 before!!

    Nice system though.


    Those despicable Elk,stealing the pond weed!

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Enermax now do a SFX PSU too which CB reviewed. It seems to be CWT who I don't really care for though although unsure how they compare the Corsairs which are GreatWall according to this
    http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page447.htm
    See those RealHardTechX people haven't added the ComputerBase review to the Enermax SFX though
    http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page567.htm
    A quick filtering search on skinflint
    https://skinflint.co.uk/?cat=gehps&xf=4174_SFX
    shows nothing better than Gold Plus in SFX though. Unfortunately skinflint don't list the OEM and cross referencing all 22 hits for SFX trying to find them would be a fair bit extra work. Been toying with swapping back to smaller case but it would most likely be mATX and I'm not sure if SFX would gain me anything there. Other problem is that current monster case (Aerocool DS 200 which I got cheap from Amazon warehouse) has got nice silencing foam (like FD's Defines and the Nanoxia) and all dampened mATX case I've seen are all 40L plus so what's the point?

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    Quote Originally Posted by kompukare View Post
    I do believe what EndlessWaves actually said was dropping the top of the range card down to 50W not from 267W
    Oops my bad. Weird point to make, power usage is directly connected to performance, sure newer tech and manufacturing processes improve it, but the goal is to get the most performance, not use the least power

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    Cool Re: Corsair One Pro

    Always interested to see how companies are approaching this type of build and enjoyed the read.

    Though I was surprised with a couple of things - only 2400MHz ram, no m.2 (although I will agree, the average person may not tell the difference), and to top it off, a little pricey without these better parts - the Scan 3XS Z170 Vengeance Q performed as well or better for £400 less (no in game comparisons).
    Instead of the 1080 in the Scan, that £400 could help upgrade to a 1080 TI hybrid.

    And then there was a comment which had me giggling - "Makes you wonder why enthusiasts still go for 1.2kW supplies in standard builds" - well to let you know, I bought a 1200W Enermax Platimax for Australian $65 (approximately £35) brand new from a closing down sale at the beginning of 2016. In Australia, platinum PSU's are very expensive (example since this is a Corsair, a quick look shows HX750i 750W platinum PSU starts at about $200 right now).
    So, my question to you is - why not?
    Last edited by whatif; 24-03-2017 at 10:20 AM. Reason: typing errors

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    I actually quite like this. In terms of hardware vs form factor, it's a lot more substantial than those "Steam Box"es that were doing the rounds last year (are those still on?). It's not targeted at me - I'd always build my own if I was spending this kind of money, but I can see this appealing to people who can't be bothered with all that but want to spend the money on a decent set of hardware regardless.

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    Re: Corsair One Pro

    I'm surprised Windows 10 Pro isn't used in this, even in the "pro" versions. It probably wouldn't have added much to the total price.

    Not that I endorse any version of Windows 10, mind you...

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