Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: is CPU burn in nonsense?

  1. #1
    Formerly known as Viet Cong Zombi and tuone
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,111
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked
    5 times in 5 posts

    is CPU burn in nonsense?

    if it was possible to add a couple of hundred mhz to CPUs by putting special voltages through them and changing the molecular structure, don't you think that the silicon companies would have figured it out by now rather than it being a myth, seeing as they always pursue extra performance?

  2. #2
    Mostly Me Lucio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tring
    Posts
    5,163
    Thanks
    443
    Thanked
    448 times in 351 posts
    • Lucio's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Gigabyte GA-970A-UD3P
      • CPU:
      • AMD FX-6350 with Cooler Master Seldon 240
      • Memory:
      • 2x4GB Corsair DDR3 Vengeance
      • Storage:
      • 128GB Toshiba, 2.5" SSD, 1TB WD Blue WD10EZEX, 500GB Seagate Baracuda 7200.11
      • Graphics card(s):
      • Sapphire R9 270X 4GB
      • PSU:
      • 600W Silverstone Strider SST-ST60F
      • Case:
      • Cooler Master HAF XB
      • Operating System:
      • Windows 8.1 64Bit
      • Monitor(s):
      • Samsung 2032BW, 1680 x 1050
      • Internet:
      • 16Mb Plusnet
    Regardless as to whether or not they're aware of it, it's probably not a technique that's viable for mass production. Let's not forget here that the vast majority of computers are sold to end up in the hands of everyday people who really only want stability and a reasonable speed.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0 times in 0 posts
    maybe they have, and they've been using it to make their better cpu's...

    eg, u buy a athlon 3200, and pay the extra £20. little do you know, uve actually gone and bought a 3000 which has been clocked up and burned in

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    215
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked
    2 times in 2 posts
    except you can look at the chip itself or use something like cpu-z will tell you what you're running

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0 times in 0 posts
    well duhh!!!
    i mean, the 3200 could have exactly the same stuff inside as the 3000, but the changed the multiplyier to 10, and burned it in. changed the model info data, and there u go!!

  6. #6
    Filthy old man noTHINGface's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Herts
    Posts
    1,397
    Thanks
    29
    Thanked
    21 times in 20 posts
    "is CPU burn in nonsense?" - Yes. Though it gives people who like to fiddle something to do, cf running in new motors. And yes, I was someone who would religiously burn in a new cpu back in the day.
    What we share with everyone is glum, and dark...

  7. #7
    Formerly known as Viet Cong Zombi and tuone
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,111
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked
    5 times in 5 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by hsncool View Post
    well duhh!!!
    i mean, the 3200 could have exactly the same stuff inside as the 3000, but the changed the multiplyier to 10, and burned it in. changed the model info data, and there u go!!
    if that was part of the manufacturing process, then someone in the past 10 years would have reported it as actually existing in fact, rather like the Loch Ness monster. Perhaps the Loch Ness monster exists . A lot of people go to lock ness to find the monster too.

  8. #8
    Mostly Harmless
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    347
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0 times in 0 posts
    I really doubt very much that chip manufacturers waste time and money 'burning chips in' for a few hundred mhz and a small price increase. It's much cheaper to just make loads of them and speed bin them rather than wasting god knows how many hours and how much power doing the 'burn in'

    And it's only ever been anecdotal that it works, a few voices on the internet claiming it worked for them, far from scientific.
    "You've gotta laugh when you fall off a sofa!"

  9. #9
    root Member DanceswithUnix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    In the middle of a core dump
    Posts
    9,729
    Thanks
    479
    Thanked
    995 times in 847 posts
    • DanceswithUnix's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Asus X470-PRO
      • CPU:
      • 2600X
      • Memory:
      • 16GB 3200MHz
      • Storage:
      • 1TB Linux, 1TB Games (Win 10)
      • Graphics card(s):
      • Asus Strix RX Vega 56
      • PSU:
      • 650W Corsair TX
      • Case:
      • Antec 300
      • Operating System:
      • Fedora 28 + Win 10 Pro 64 (yuk)
      • Monitor(s):
      • Benq XL2730Z 1440p + Samsung 2343BW 2048x1152
      • Internet:
      • Zen 80Mb/20Mb VDSL
    Well I have used it in the past many years ago and it did work for me. Of course the feature sizes and materials used in modern CPUs are all different now so the technique may no longer work. The fact that I couldn't even tell you which CPU I saw the effect on shows how long ago it was (probably ~10 years ago)

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    2,594
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked
    106 times in 94 posts
    Ive never burnt a CPU in. I honestly dont beileve it serves any purpose except waste my time.

    I just put a new CPU in and if it boots into windows, then I immediately start overclocking. Probably within a minute of first turning it on. I did it with my current cpu.

  11. #11
    No-one's Fanboi Thorsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Neverneverland
    Posts
    2,749
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked
    93 times in 92 posts
    • Thorsson's system
      • Motherboard:
      • ASUS P8Z77-V PRO
      • CPU:
      • i5 3570k
      • Memory:
      • 2x8Gb Corsair Vengeance PC1866
      • Storage:
      • 256M4 SSD; 2Tb 7200RPM Barracuda; 2Tb Linkstation
      • Graphics card(s):
      • EVGA GTX970 SC
      • PSU:
      • Corsair HX650
      • Case:
      • Antec 300
      • Operating System:
      • Win10 64
      • Monitor(s):
      • Dell 2515H
      • Internet:
      • Fibre Optic 30Mb
    What does "burn in" is the heatsink, or rather the arctic silver or what have you. As this means somewhat better cooling it may well lead to a small increase in OC ability.

  12. #12
    Gentoo Ricer
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Galway
    Posts
    10,958
    Thanks
    987
    Thanked
    940 times in 700 posts
    • aidanjt's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Asus Strix Z370-G
      • CPU:
      • Intel i7-8700K
      • Memory:
      • 2x8GB Corsiar LPX 3000C15
      • Storage:
      • 500GB Samsung 960 EVO
      • Graphics card(s):
      • EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0
      • PSU:
      • EVGA G3 750W
      • Case:
      • Fractal Design Define C Mini
      • Operating System:
      • Windows 10 Pro
      • Monitor(s):
      • Asus MG279Q
      • Internet:
      • 240mbps Virgin Cable
    It's a myth in overclocking circles that running a CPU with a maximum load for a day or two will 'stretch' the silicon die and let you overclock it if further without the dreaded electro-migration problem destabilising the core. A pretty stupid one considering CPUs are solid state.
    Quote Originally Posted by Agent View Post
    ...every time Creative bring out a new card range their advertising makes it sound like they have discovered a way to insert a thousand Chuck Norris super dwarfs in your ears...

  13. #13
    Senior Member kalniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    28,998
    Thanks
    1,473
    Thanked
    2,904 times in 2,353 posts
    • kalniel's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Gigabyte X58A UD3R rev 2
      • CPU:
      • Intel Xeon X5680
      • Memory:
      • 12gb DDR3 2000
      • Graphics card(s):
      • nVidia GTX 1060 6GB
      • PSU:
      • Seasonic 600W
      • Case:
      • Cooler Master HAF 912
      • Operating System:
      • Win 10 Pro x64
      • Monitor(s):
      • Dell U2311H
      • Internet:
      • O2 8mbps
    Quote Originally Posted by Thorsson View Post
    What does "burn in" is the heatsink, or rather the arctic silver or what have you. As this means somewhat better cooling it may well lead to a small increase in OC ability.
    Yup. Pads on retail processors and the Artic Cooler series certainly take a while to burn in.

  14. #14
    lazy student nvening's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    London
    Posts
    4,656
    Thanks
    196
    Thanked
    31 times in 30 posts
    Most processors, especially the low end ones, are more than capable of reaching higher clock speeds than their default speed and thats exactly why OCing is possible.

    Therefore an A64 3000+ is the same as a 3200+ but the 3000+ is sold at the slower speed so they can charge less and so cater for the budget end of the market, where most of the market is.

    Not sure if that made sense lol
    (\__/)
    (='.'=)
    (")_(")

  15. #15
    Mostly Harmless
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    347
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0 times in 0 posts
    Yah it did indeed.

    Basically intel & amd have one manufacturing line. They will then speed bin processors to find those capable of certain speeds under the most harsh conditions customers may use a pc in. But chances are that there will be more cpu's capable of top clock speeds than there is demand for and these find there way down into the lower models with multiplier locks in place to prevent their sale as higher end models.

    So that 3000+ may be a cpu that failed testing at the top available clock speed under the max usable temp amd claim it will work at, using a good cooling setup will probably still allow it to clock higher than stock though.

    It may also be a cpu that passed testing for much higher speed, but market demand for cheaper models is far greater than for high end chips, so it was taken and locked down to the lower multiplier. Even with stock cooling this chip will overclock to the levels of high end units.

    As for burning in, who knows, maybe there is something in this voodoo nonsense maybe not. As another poster mentioned the thermal compound can over time improve it's performance as the pressure of the heatsink and temperature of the cpu force it into a more efficient distribution. I know with ceramanique it needed a working in phase before it reached it's peak performance.
    "You've gotta laugh when you fall off a sofa!"

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Firefox CPU usage and Flash plug-in insanity
    By Rys in forum Help! Quick Relief From Tech Headaches
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-02-2010, 10:14 AM
  2. Pent D CPU Temp - 56c idel, 64 load
    By tickedon in forum Help! Quick Relief From Tech Headaches
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 31-10-2006, 07:51 AM
  3. CPU Seems low 3DMark 05
    By emul8 in forum PC Hardware and Components
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 23-10-2006, 01:12 PM
  4. 10C cpu temp increase after installing modem/router
    By ives in forum Networking and Broadband
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-07-2004, 02:21 PM
  5. CPU TIM Guide
    By Steve in forum Help! Quick Relief From Tech Headaches
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30-05-2004, 02:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •