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Thread: ASUS CPU Parameter Recall (CPR) - works with RAID?

  1. #1
    Taz
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    ASUS CPU Parameter Recall (CPR) - works with RAID?

    I've been playing around with overclocking and have managed to overclock too far. When my system boots it now says, "System failed due to CPU overclocking" (via the voice messages). Theoretically (according to the motherboard manual), I can avoid clearing the CMOS RAM to reset the BIOS parameters by just rebooting (switching off and switching on) causing the motherboard to automatically load failsafe values. But this does not happen. I just get the same error by voice again and the system just sits there with a single diagnostic line on the display.

    Thus, I have assumed that the CPR feature advertised by Asus does not actually work in my situation leaving me no choice but to clear the CMOS.

    However, I have a RAID 0 setup. If I cleared the CMOS it would also forget about the RAID settings. Hence, this would render my disks unbootable, requiring me to re-install XP (again!).

    I just need confirmation that my understanding is correct. If it is true then CPR does not work with RAID setups.

  2. #2
    RDL
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    Have you tried turning the power off at the wall and back on? This sometimes works, although I haven't tried it on the A8V.

  3. #3
    Taz
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    • Taz's system
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      • Corsair CMK16GX4M2B3200C16R Vengeance LPX 16 GB
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    I'll try that when i'm back home tonight. I was only switching the PSU off using the power switch on the PSU on the back of the case. Will disconnecting the entire system from the wall outlet make a difference?

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    RDL
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    Well, if the system hangs due to overclocking this can help. Like I said I haven't tried it on the A8V though, so I couldn't tell you if it will in this specific situation. I know that it definately works in a couple of my rigs.

  5. #5
    Taz
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    • Taz's system
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      • CPU:
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      • Corsair CMK16GX4M2B3200C16R Vengeance LPX 16 GB
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      • Samsung 960 EVO M.2-2280 500GB (PCIe) + 1TB Sandisk Ultra II SSD (SATA)
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      • PSU:
      • Corsair CS550M 550W Hybrid
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      • NZXT Source 340
      • Operating System:
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    I had to bite the bullet and clear the CMOS RAM (remove power, remove battery on motherboard, set jumper for 5-10 seconds, reset jumper, put battery back in and power up). This appears to have coped with the RAID configuration without any problems.

    Back to trying to overclock...

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    HEXUS webmaster Steve's Avatar
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    RAID configuration isn't saved in the BIOS - it is written to the disks when the array is created. That's why clearing the CMOS has no effect on the state of your array.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taz
    I've been playing around with overclocking and have managed to overclock too far. When my system boots it now says, "System failed due to CPU overclocking" (via the voice messages). Theoretically (according to the motherboard manual), I can avoid clearing the CMOS RAM to reset the BIOS parameters by just rebooting (switching off and switching on) causing the motherboard to automatically load failsafe values. But this does not happen. I just get the same error by voice again and the system just sits there with a single diagnostic line on the display.

    Thus, I have assumed that the CPR feature advertised by Asus does not actually work in my situation leaving me no choice but to clear the CMOS.

    However, I have a RAID 0 setup. If I cleared the CMOS it would also forget about the RAID settings. Hence, this would render my disks unbootable, requiring me to re-install XP (again!)

    I just need confirmation that my understanding is correct. If it is true then CPR does not work with RAID setups.

    More worrying to me would be the CPR not working, I too have oced to far on my cpu (tried 30% with the AI oc to achieve 4.16gig). Same message (Sys failure due to overclocking) rebooted and yes CPR kicked in allowing me to the bios to reduce oc.

    A question: was your oc done with the AI oc or manually? How far did you try to take it?
    I realise you solved yoyr problem but I'm curious.

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    HEXUS webmaster Steve's Avatar
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    What BIOS version are you running?

    I'm on the beta 1004, but I haven't played with it yet as I'm still getting the system together.
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  9. #9
    Taz
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    • Taz's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Gigabyte Z270 HD3P
      • CPU:
      • Intel Core i5 7600K
      • Memory:
      • Corsair CMK16GX4M2B3200C16R Vengeance LPX 16 GB
      • Storage:
      • Samsung 960 EVO M.2-2280 500GB (PCIe) + 1TB Sandisk Ultra II SSD (SATA)
      • Graphics card(s):
      • Asus NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 OC
      • PSU:
      • Corsair CS550M 550W Hybrid
      • Case:
      • NZXT Source 340
      • Operating System:
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    I tried to take it to 230 FSB manually. I set LDT Bus Frequency to 800MHz (this in fact becomes a memory divider from what i've learnt so far). The memory was actually running at 183MHz, well below its rated 200MHz so I set the timings to 2-2-2-5 (again, memory is rated at those timings).

    The CPU FSB was 230MHz (represents 15% increase of stock FSB). The multiplier was 11. All voltages were set stock levels and I think this level of o/c should have been achievable quite easily. But it didn't boot, just talked to me and I got a line of display at the top of the screen. This seemed to refer to P4 components! I've got an A64 motherboard. It's also interesting to note that the Asus Web site only refers to CPR for their P4 motherboards although on one other page my motherboard is listed as having CPR (the manual for it also mentions this).

    I have a suspicion that CPR only works for AI o/c and not manual. I'm trying again as we speak and so far i've managed a 1% stable o/c - not impressive!

  10. #10
    Taz
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    • Taz's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Gigabyte Z270 HD3P
      • CPU:
      • Intel Core i5 7600K
      • Memory:
      • Corsair CMK16GX4M2B3200C16R Vengeance LPX 16 GB
      • Storage:
      • Samsung 960 EVO M.2-2280 500GB (PCIe) + 1TB Sandisk Ultra II SSD (SATA)
      • Graphics card(s):
      • Asus NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 OC
      • PSU:
      • Corsair CS550M 550W Hybrid
      • Case:
      • NZXT Source 340
      • Operating System:
      • Windows 10 Pro
      • Monitor(s):
      • 34" Asus Designo Curve MX34VQ UWQHD Monitor
      • Internet:
      • Virgin Media Vivid 200
    Quote Originally Posted by Kez
    What BIOS version are you running?

    I'm on the beta 1004, but I haven't played with it yet as I'm still getting the system together.
    Kez, i'm running the official 1003 BIOS - released last week. Where did you get 1004 beta from? Have you got the same board as me (Asus A8V-E Deluxe)?

    My initial impressions are that this is a great board for stock use but not very good for o/c but i'm determined to get the speeds of 25.-2.6GHz. I spent a week reading every article on overclocking that I could find before I even attempted to do anything. Of course, it could just be that i'm rubbish at o/c'ing!

    [Edit]: I've been playing around with the overclocking features of the Asus A8V-E Deluxe and the best I can get is 230MHz x 11 multiplier = 2.53GHz CPU rate. To get that I left the memory on 'Auto' settings and the BIOS set a memory frequency of just over 180MHz (instead of the 200MHz that I can get if I run the CPU at stock settings). Thus, whilst there is a significant increase in CPU power, the memory is clocked a bit slower than normal. I've locked the PCI-E bus at 100MHz and the PCI bus at 33MHz. I'm not sure I can get anything more out of my setup but it does seem fairly stable and CPU temperatures range between 40C - 46C after a good hour of FS2004. The CPU idle temperatures are a bit high at 35-39C after leaving Windows booted up for 15 minutes doing nothing. I've also noticed that in many cases the motherboard temperature is higher than the CPU temperature as the XP-90 and Panaflo are a pretty good cooling solution. I've also enabled Asus Q-Fan to speed up the fans at around 43C so the system is very quiet virtually all the time.
    Last edited by Taz; 13-02-2005 at 12:40 AM.

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