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Thread: Hyperdrive -DRAM based hard drive -superfast!

  1. #33
    Seething Cauldron of Hatred TheAnimus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aidanjt
    http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.asp?DriveID=65
    5 year warrenty.. You're forgetting the Raptors are using SCSI mechanical parts with a cheaper SATA interface controller. The interface is the only difference between them and SCSI disks in 10,000RPM catagory. I have two and I've had them for a year, and I havn't given them much resting time, still havn't died on me.

    I don't have anything against SCSI, in fact if I had more money than sense I'd use it on every machine in this house. SCSI is very mature, and pretty much perfect for demanding disk I/O, but that doesn't change the fact that it costs a small fortune.

    I just wish you'd stop blabbing unsubstantiated nonsense all the time, back in real world (tm) people buy SATA products because its a good ballance of price/performance, and Linux actually doesn't suck when you know how to use it.
    My 10krpm drives have larger platters, well higher platter densisity. Which 10krpm scsi's are exactly the same as them? I had a quick google but couldn't turn up any!

    As for linux? Sir, i know how to use linux, having written my own device driver, and played with it on embedded sticks, my hatred dosen't come from a lack of knowledge, i just prefer BSD and with modern CPU speeds can't see a need for linux as BSD is better.

    Butcher, i'm guessing its because its not really a SATA device, its most likely been limited by the speed of the interface controller. I'd GUESS that its just a ata interface, with a sata convertor stuck on the front, as this would be easy to design and quite cheap for low production quantity.
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    Senior Member kalniel's Avatar
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    Raptors are indeed scsi with a SATA interface.

    Have a look at scans scsi disks sometime and note the similar capacities to the raptor. And a 5 yr warrenty is pretty good.

    That said, the real advantages of RAM drives are power, noise and heat - or the reduction thereof.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheAnimus
    As for linux? Sir, i know how to use linux, having written my own device driver...
    Really?.. Which one?.. I could take a quick look in my kernel sources.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheAnimus
    ...i just prefer BSD and with modern CPU speeds can't see a need for linux as BSD is better.
    Better acording to whom? and in what context? and what proof do you bear this claim?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheAnimus
    Butcher, i'm guessing its because its not really a SATA device, its most likely been limited by the speed of the interface controller. I'd GUESS that its just a ata interface, with a sata convertor stuck on the front, as this would be easy to design and quite cheap for low production quantity.
    The HyperDrive only uses an ATA100 interface, more than likely they include an ATA->SATA adopter to claim SATA compatiablity. The iMax has a real SATA I interface though.
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    ...every time Creative bring out a new card range their advertising makes it sound like they have discovered a way to insert a thousand Chuck Norris super dwarfs in your ears...

  4. #36
    Seething Cauldron of Hatred TheAnimus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalniel
    Raptors are indeed scsi with a SATA interface.

    Have a look at scans scsi disks sometime and note the similar capacities to the raptor. And a 5 yr warrenty is pretty good.
    http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/Produ...Thumbnails=yes can't see any with the same platter size there, which brand are they under? Its defo not seagate or maxtor, or fujitsu.

    That said, the real advantages of RAM drives are power, noise and heat - or the reduction thereof.[/QUOTE]No moving parts too, should mean less failure.
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  5. #37
    Seething Cauldron of Hatred TheAnimus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aidanjt
    Really?.. Which one?.. I could take a quick look in my kernel sources.
    Better acording to whom? and in what context? and what proof do you bear this claim?
    its a ISA driver to bang data to an Atmega, i never used it again because i was been paid to write it, so its not my source to share (sorry but when you've got 8k in debt, 12k by hte end of this academic year, i find it hard to be anything but capitalist). But if you've any questions feal free to start a thread and i'll do my best to help. But its not a nice experiance as they have no concept of a HAL (hardware abstraction layer) at play.

    CPU speed, threading speed, this is complicated, now all of this is from an x86 perspective, but you have the context registers which have a bitmap which limits what you can access from different rings (0,1,2,3) 0 been unrestricted, 3 been most restricted. Now linux isn't as mean as BSD or NT in enforcing certain rules with these registers (the big question been how does one call an API? NT uses interupt 2e, which has a vector set to look at a table and bing your in kernel mode (ring 0, from ring 3). BSD and linux are slightly different, if you look at an assembly programming guide, you will see Hello World is more complex in BSD. This is the only way BSD is slower. And on a slow CPU doing simple things (one proccess taking most teh time) you will see linux to be faster.)

    But when it comes to shunting these processes around, linux is really playing catch up, pre-emptive multithreading (something so simple i wrote it on a PIC18, which is a very limited uC by todays standards, gits at uni wouldn't let me have one of the nice Ti DSPs, 500mhz... gits..) has only just been added in 2.6. The defense of it was that it dosen't provide much of a performance boost?! Bollocks dosen't it. This is a simple example of the systematic denail of anything linux dosen't have thats advantagous. I'm not saying linux is bad as such, there are some things it does well, but for a desktop, or a server thats serving lots of things. Its just not what its good at.

    Now how does this effect the RAID i hear you cry, simple. When you have a file request, what must happen? If you have a kernel debugger installed, i'd recomend stepping over the proccess as it will explain it much better than my dislexic ramblings. Then do the same with BSD. Stepping over with a debugger is my prefered way of learning about functions, its just you have to learn what to step over so don't be thinking you won't crash ur computer a bit!
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  6. #38
    Senior Member kalniel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheAnimus
    http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/Produ...Thumbnails=yes can't see any with the same platter size there, which brand are they under? Its defo not seagate or maxtor, or fujitsu.
    WD raptor 36gb - 2 heads 1 platter (=36gb platter)

    Seagate 10k 68pin 36gb - 1 platter (=36gb platter)

    All other 36gb scsi drives I am assuming to be 36gb platters too.

    WD raptor 74gb = 4 heads 2 platters - they have just doubled up the 36gb model.

    Maxtor Atlas 10 IV 73.5gb = two 36gb platters

    More recent 73/73.5 scsi's have not (the altas V for eg.), they have 1 platter. But it doesn't change the fact that the raptor is based on two 36gb platter scsi technology.

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    the bearings and actuator are classic scsi design as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Agent View Post
    ...every time Creative bring out a new card range their advertising makes it sound like they have discovered a way to insert a thousand Chuck Norris super dwarfs in your ears...

  8. #40
    Seething Cauldron of Hatred TheAnimus's Avatar
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    not disputing any similarities in aproach, as there is little that different in a conceptual way between most HDDs (except horizontal vrs vertical bits).

    The TPI of a WD raptor is 95 apprently, New ones are going to be 100.

    All of seagate's are 105, ergo the platters are different size (think physical mm size).

    QED.

    All i am saying its its not a SCSI drive underneeth, its not built by someone who's been making ultra reliable bits of kit for years. I'm not disputing the cost benefit for most people, its just I got all mine second hand without much problem at all. Heck the 15krpm ones in my main rig, got all 5 for < &#163;120 inc vat P&P just by watching ebay. All got warrenty, a low level format + verify + redundancy with RAID is all thats needed.

    For more on HDD in depth:
    http://www.lostcircuits.com/hdd/hdd2/3.shtml
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  9. #41
    Nox
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    Actually the raptor is a 40gb platter with the last 4 gb lopped off. This is what explains the high xfer rate at the low end of the drive.

    Nox

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