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Thread: Drive or directory encryption that works with your Windows login password

  1. #1
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    Drive or directory encryption that works with your Windows login password

    The problem with using a password to prevent people from accessing your data is they could simply open your PC case, yank out your hard drive and slap it in a another PC as a slave. Then they can just browse all your files at their convenience.

    I know there are several programs that allow you to create a virtual encrypted disk, but is there any that will work with your Windows password to let you just encrypt a certain directory or perhaps the entire disk, and you won't have to enter any passwords or mount/unmount the virtual partition.

    E.g.: Once you log into Windows, it will automatically give full access.

    Thanks

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    ^^

    Also, I just read the faq on BitLocker for Vista, which seems to be exactly what I need.

    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system...LockerFAQ.mspx

    The only problem could be that they say if system files appear tampered with, the data is unrecoverable. So what if a patch or a program / virus modifies the system files? I hope there's some sort of override.

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    If you have XP Pro then why buy something when you can get it free (from Windows Help):

    Encrypting File System overview

    Encrypting File System (EFS) provides the core file encryption technology used to store encrypted files on NTFS file system volumes. Once you encrypt a file or folder, you work with the encrypted file or folder just as you do with any other files and folders.

    Encryption is transparent to the user that encrypted the file. This means that you do not have to manually decrypt the encrypted file before you can use it. You can open and change the file as you normally do.

    Using EFS is similar to using permissions on files and folders. Both methods can be used to restrict access to data. However, an intruder who gains unauthorized physical access to your encrypted files or folders will be prevented from reading them. If the intruder tries to open or copy your encrypted file or folder he receives an access denied message. Permissions on files and folders does not protect against unauthorized physical attacks.

    You encrypt or decrypt a folder or file by setting the encryption property for folders and files just as you set any other attribute such as read-only, compressed, or hidden. If you encrypt a folder, all files and subfolders created in the encrypted folder are automatically encrypted. It is recommended that you encrypt at the folder level.

    You can also encrypt or decrypt a file or folder using the cipher command. For more information, see Cipher.

    When you work with encrypted files and folders, keep in mind the following information:

    Only files and folders on NTFS volumes can be encrypted. Because WebDAV works with NTFS, NTFS is required when encrypting files over WebDAV (Web distributed authoring and versioning).
    Files or folders that are compressed cannot also be encrypted. If the user marks a file or folder for encryption, that file or folder will be uncompressed.
    Encrypted files can become decrypted if you copy or move the file to a volume that is not an NTFS volume.
    Moving unencrypted files into an encrypted folder will automatically encrypt those files in the new folder. However, the reverse operation will not automatically decrypt files. Files must be explicitly decrypted.
    Files marked with the System attribute cannot be encrypted, nor can files in the systemroot directory structure.
    Encrypting a folder or file does not protect against deletion or listing files or directories. Anyone with the appropriate permissions can delete or list encrypted folders or files. For this reason, using EFS in combination with NTFS permissions is recommended.

    You can encrypt or decrypt files and folders located on a remote computer that has been enabled for remote encryption. However, if you open the encrypted file over the network, the data that is transmitted over the network by this process is not encrypted. Other protocols, such as SSL/TLS (Secure Socket Layer/Transport Layer Security) or Internet Protocol security (IPSec) must be used to encrypt data over the wire. WebDAV, however, is able to encrypt the file locally and transmit it in encrypted form.

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    ^ thanks, nice find. I'll check that out

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    i havn't used this, its only just been released by microsoft and i'm not sure if it encrypts or what....

    http://news.com.com/Microsoft+hands+...3-6092153.html

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    efs only works if you have an active directory in place. it need to auth with the server. it woint auth on the system itself
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    Quote Originally Posted by alsenior
    efs only works if you have an active directory in place. it need to auth with the server. it woint auth on the system itself
    Not sure where you got that from but it's pointing you in the wrong direction! EFS has been available since w2k and is available in XPPro and Windows 2003. It does not need AD, it just needs XP Pro!

    http://www.surasoft.com/articles/xpefs.php

    http://www.practicalpc.co.uk/computi...xpencrypt1.htm
    Last edited by blueball; 16-07-2006 at 06:39 PM.

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    latrosicarius, Can I strongly suggest you go to Amazon.com and Get some Microsoft self paced training kits
    Every single question you have asked here so far will be answered in the books required for a Windows 2003 MCSA
    P.S. if you get 70-284 (Exchange 2003), make sure its revision C or later as the first 2 are shockingly bad for accuracy.
    Start with 70-270 (Windows XP), then do 70-291 (Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 environment)
    after those, do the rest of these if you feel the need to.
    Last edited by badass; 16-07-2006 at 10:10 PM.
    "In a perfect world... spammers would get caught, go to jail, and share a cell with many men who have enlarged their penises, taken Viagra and are looking for a new relationship."

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    Quote Originally Posted by badass
    latrosicarius, Can I strongly suggest you go to Amazon.com and Get some Microsoft self paced training kits
    Every single question you have asked here so far will be answered in the books required for a Windows 2003 MCSA
    P.S. if you get 70-284 (Exchange 2003), make sure its revision C or later as the first 2 are shockingly bad for accuracy.
    Start with 70-270 (Windows XP), then do 70-291 (Managing and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 environment)
    after those, do the rest of these if you feel the need to.
    Yeah, I might just do that... thanks for the suggestion

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