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Thread: NVIDIA debut EPP memory standard

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    HEXUS webmaster Steve's Avatar
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    NVIDIA debut EPP memory standard

    It's all about overclocking, but don't you dare call it that!
    Effectively the module will say, "hey, while outwardly I'm DDR2-XX memory at this voltage and these timing parameters, if you overvolt a bit and relax these settings, I'll go even faster, and I fully support you configuring me to do so".
    http://www.hexus.net/content/item.php?item=5622
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    Woah; I see the most important factor is left out of your write up? Price! What premium are these units going to carry?

    This seems like another shift down the path of high-end niche products to me; the rationalisation of the market to eliminate all the variables that previously, the merry geek would try out for himself. My case of Chrometoramophobia just got even worse...

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    DR
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    Well - EPP should not add any premium - its the same cost as the SPD being programmed.

    So; compare 2 parts - one with and one without.

    Twin2x2048-6400 to Twin2x2048-6400C4

    Since they are based on spin-binned IC's - the memory is different - latencies et al, so at retail you will see a $10 to $20 difference.

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    This seems like another shift down the path of high-end niche products to me; the rationalisation of the market to eliminate all the variables that previously, the merry geek would try out for himself. My case of Chrometoramophobia just got even worse...
    Eh? Its a bonus feature not a need feature - if you have X and Y you get Z - but if you don't have both X and Y they work in their own right too

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    Well, I just see it as another extravagance, really, I suppose. My philosophy is to get the cheapest and overclock, as opposed to spending a premium for these top end products and having them overclock themselves. But, yea fair enough, there'll be plenty of takers for these, just like RAM with lights on and with insane speed ratings.

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    It's not a new product as such, more an enhancement to memory modules. It simply adds a kind of 'BIOS' to the memory sticks with loads of info about their capabilities. A must have for all overclockers out there

    I don't reckon any price hike will be seen at all.

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    Banhammer in peace PeterB kalniel's Avatar
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    I'm not quite getting the advantage here.

    Does it just mean that you can effectively change the SPD on a chipset, so that motherboards that detect 'auto' settings default to the new ones? What advantage does that give over just manually setting timings etc that are different to the SPD?

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    I think what we're talking about here is new chipsets (nForce5 perhaps) being able to detect the overclockability of memory via EPP and then adjusting the system settings automatically to take advantage of that overclock....sounds pretty cool

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    Banhammer in peace PeterB kalniel's Avatar
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    What do you mean by adjust system settings? SPD already tells the motherboard what the overclockability of the memory is. The advantage of EPP is that the settings aren't fixed so you can set it higher than the manufacturers recommendations. But this isn't any different than setting the motherboard to ignore SPD and run it how you tell it surely? The only difference is the setting is being done on the RAM's 'BIOS' rather than the motherboards.

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    No.
    SPD just tells the motherboard what the default timings are at stock.
    EPP goes one further and adds data on what the memory can be pushed too. It's not user-configurable, and will be preset by the memory mfr.

    Read this -> http://www.nvidia.com/object/IO_31187.html

  11. #11
    Banhammer in peace PeterB kalniel's Avatar
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    I think it is user configurable on the new NVidia chipset. From reading that I'm pretty sure now that it's basically like pre-programmed SPD/voltage settings, so you can switch between profiles on the RAM rather than on the motherboard BIOS. Ie maybe a gain in user friendlyness, but no real benefit to people putting in these values manually in the first place.

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