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Thread: FSP Aurum PT 1,200W

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    FSP Aurum PT 1,200W

    Platinum power needn't cost the earth.
    Read more.

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    Re: FSP Aurum PT 1,200W

    Nice review, thanks.
    I like using these higher wattage platinum PSU's as sometimes my PC is left running for days performing minor tasks, but I also get into playing demanding games and like to turn up the dial on my PC's potential. Have not seen it included over the past few years, but I had a Gigabyte MB that allowed me to switch off my video cards while in windows when not needed - thought that was a great tool to reduce noise, power usage, and heat - wonder why that function disappeared? Or do some still have it and I just couldn't see for looking?
    Even though I run a relatively simple system (water cooling on CPU with a slight overclock and either 1 or 2 high end video cards also with water cooling), I like to try and come close to doubling to PC's total requirement by about a factor of 2 (I aim to run at somewhere around 40% to 60% of it's potential, always plenty of overhead left, runs cooler and quieter, and runs within it's best efficiency band). So I have been running a 1350W platinum for a few years now in my gaming PC without any problems and a 1200W in my work PC.
    Please correct me if this is wrong - but after reading reviews and such, to me this appears to be borne out by the comments and figures.

    Just to offer some constructive criticism - Pity that there were not other PSU's included ( I picked Enermax as as good example, because they designed and made their own, the company has been around for about as long, plus Hexus has a review of a Enermax Platimax 1200w - so it is the right category and capacity, and may offer a good independently manufactured comparison, but any others would be fine to add). It would have been nice to see how they compare and how much (or not) they have evolved and improved over this time. I am sure there are a few of us out there who have some of the older ones and would like to see how they stack up.
    Would also be good to see if there is any major drop in any areas of performance or efficiency over the years of usage. After all, we did spend the extra for their platinum efficiency and performance, and although I have read comments concerning their deterioration, I have not seen any tests or comparisons on PSU's that have had a couple of years of use and possibly abuse.
    Maybe a topic for a future article.
    Last edited by whatif; 24-10-2015 at 11:56 AM. Reason: spelling and diction

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    Re: FSP Aurum PT 1,200W

    Provided the efficiency is the same, a 350W power supply delivering 300W at 80% should dissipate the same amount of heat as a 1000W rater supply delivering 300W at 80%. The difference is more that to deliver 1500W, a 1200W PSU needs to be able to dump 300W somewhere, while at most, a 350W supply needs to handle ~90W.

    However, in terms of component wear, that means that the beefy power supplies have better heat sinks and larger fans. Most of the components are probably rated the same for temperature, since it's unlikely you'd want to push any system over +125C anyway.

    Whether it makes sense to double or triple your PSU capacity depends on what certification the supply has:

    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/power-...w-32356-2.html

    In the end it may give you some slight energy savings, but not much. Won't hurt though.

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    Re: FSP Aurum PT 1,200W

    Thanks for your reply, always open to others thoughts and comments.
    Unfortunately the link provided keeps coming up with a 404 - Page Not Found error.
    I had checked with PSU calculators and the minimum recommended result with one video card comes back at around 700W (that is the 50% I mentioned) and with two cards comes back at just over 1000W (calculated with only 2 AIO coolers and I run 3 when I have 2 cards in crossfire). So it still has plenty of headroom for plugging in all sorts of things (like I run 2x dual TV tuners as I use it as a HTPC as well).
    As for the heat, I considered that with good components, just like you mentioned it should have better heatsinks and it has a 140mm fan, so the heat it generates should be well within what it is capable of coping with and dissipating, compared to say a 850W running closer to it's maximum (sorry, my fault, I did not explain myself well by just putting in "cooler").
    So that is why I picked a 1350W, as it gives me many options without any hassle. But the main reason I picked this one was that I managed a huge discount at the time, so I thought I'd be silly not to grab it (Was selling here for over Australian$500 or UK£235, I only paid A$130 or UK£61 for a brand new high end PSU and even now it is still selling new for well over double what I paid). Sometimes we can be lucky to be in the right place at the right time. :-)

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    Re: FSP Aurum PT 1,200W

    Good review. This PSY is really a nice one from FSP .

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