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Thread: The S in SATA HDD

  1. #1
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    The S in SATA HDD

    What is it? how much faster is it?

  2. #2
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    S = Serial

    Currently at ATA150 levels.


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    Isnt that just in burst mode?

    So it is not continously ATA150, only when transferring lots of large data.

    Will
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    . bledd's Avatar
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    the 'S' stands for Serial/Serielle , its a new(ish) type of interface for hard drives, ie, it doesn't use ATA cables. but SATA cables

    see here the two small black connectors..



    and a quicky of some sata cables


    as you can see, they're far more compact that ATA cables, aiding airflow through your case


    basically, they are rated at 150(mb/s?), instead of 100/133(mb/s?) that (p)parallelATA 'normal' drives are.


    to run one, you'll either need a motherboard with onboard SATA ports, or a SATA raid card.

    http://www.overclockers.co.uk/acatal..._Cards_49.html
    ^here's the one ocuk sell..



    in real life terms, SATA150 is not 50% faster than ATA100, altho an improvement in performance is evident
    Last edited by bledd; 05-12-2003 at 12:28 PM.

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    Resident abit mourner BUFF's Avatar
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    Mechanically they are just the same as PATA & the transfer rate is largely limited by the mechanics, it is the interface that is different.

    Of course you can get a WD Raptor 10,000rpm SATA drive which is faster due to the higher rpm.

  6. #6
    . bledd's Avatar
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    Originally posted by BUFF
    Mechanically they are just the same as PATA & the transfer rate is largely limited by the mechanics, it is the interface that is different.
    i thought it was only the seagates that are like this..

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    right will not be getting 1 then
    Email!
    bla bla bla AMD3200+ @ bla bla bla

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    Put him in the curry! Rythmic's Avatar
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    Virtually all SATA drives out there (except the Raptors - go to www.storagereview.com) are normal PATA drives with an integrated SATA bridge chip.

    The only reasons atm for SATA is future proofing (alright, not much) and thin cables.
    Now go away before I taunt you a second time.

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    F.A.S.T. Butuz's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Rythmic
    The only reasons atm for SATA is future proofing (alright, not much) and thin cables.
    And the availablity of 10,000rpm drives with 5 year warranties, and the "hot swappable" nature of the interface, and cheap raid cards compared to SCSI.



    Butuz

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