Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Making a switch to turn a motherboard on..?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    W Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,668
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked
    13 times in 11 posts

    Making a switch to turn a motherboard on..?

    I know I can turn a motherboard on by touching the two pins with a paper clip, but if I wanted to turn it off how would I go about it apart from telling the computer to shutdown or pulling the power from the PSU?

    Obviously, switches you get with cases have a clip covering both pins constantly... so how would I go about turning it off? (I should be able to figure the rest out myself )


    Cheers!

  2. #2
    YUKIKAZE arthurleung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Aberdeen
    Posts
    3,280
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked
    88 times in 83 posts
    • arthurleung's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Asus P5E (Rampage Formula 0902)
      • CPU:
      • Intel Core2Quad Q9550 3.6Ghz 1.2V
      • Memory:
      • A-Data DDR2-800 2x2GB CL4
      • Storage:
      • 4x1TB WD1000FYPS @ RAID5 3Ware 9500S-8 / 3x 1TB Samsung Ecogreen F2
      • Graphics card(s):
      • GeCube HD4870 512MB
      • PSU:
      • Corsair VX450
      • Case:
      • Antec P180
      • Operating System:
      • Windows Server 2008 Standard
      • Monitor(s):
      • Dell Ultrasharp 2709W + 2001FP
      • Internet:
      • Be*Unlimited 20Mbps
    use the same method as you power it on, touch the pins with the paper clip and count 1,2,3,4,5,6 and it goes off

    Or usually if you're logged in, just touching the pin will tell windows to shutdown.
    Workstation 1: Intel i7 950 @ 3.8Ghz / X58 / 12GB DDR3-1600 / HD4870 512MB / Antec P180
    Workstation 2: Intel C2Q Q9550 @ 3.6Ghz / X38 / 4GB DDR2-800 / 8400GS 512MB / Open Air
    Workstation 3: Intel Xeon X3350 @ 3.2Ghz / P35 / 4GB DDR2-800 / HD4770 512MB / Shuttle SP35P2
    HTPC: AMD Athlon X4 620 @ 2.6Ghz / 780G / 4GB DDR2-1000 / Antec Mini P180 White
    Mobile Workstation: Intel C2D T8300 @ 2.4Ghz / GM965 / 3GB DDR2-667 / DELL Inspiron 1525 / 6+6+9 Cell Battery

    Display (Monitor): DELL Ultrasharp 2709W + DELL Ultrasharp 2001FP
    Display (Projector): Epson TW-3500 1080p
    Speakers: Creative Megaworks THX550 5.1
    Headphones: Etymotic hf2 / Ultimate Ears Triple.fi 10 Pro

    Storage: 8x2TB Hitachi @ DELL PERC 6/i RAID6 / 13TB Non-RAID Across 12 HDDs
    Consoles: PS3 Slim 120GB / Xbox 360 Arcade 20GB / PS2

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    712
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    1 time in 1 post
    Quote Originally Posted by XA04
    ...Obviously, switches you get with cases have a clip covering both pins constantly...
    This hasn't been the case since AT style powersupplies.
    AFAIK, the power switches in todays ATX cases only 'make' the connection whilst your pressing them in. The motherboard takes closing of the circuit as an instruction to 'do something'.

    What the power switch actually does depends on the current state of the PC, and ACPI/Power Management settings.


    HTH,
    S.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    W Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,668
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked
    13 times in 11 posts
    Thanks guys!

  5. #5
    Senior Member FatalSaviour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London/Oxford/York
    Posts
    1,876
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked
    12 times in 11 posts
    • FatalSaviour's system
      • Motherboard:
      • MSI P55-GD80
      • CPU:
      • Intel Core i7 860
      • Memory:
      • 4x2GB GEiL PC17000
      • Storage:
      • 3x1000GB, 2x500GB (RAID1), 1x2TB
      • Graphics card(s):
      • GTX 470
      • PSU:
      • Corsair HX700
      • Case:
      • Antec P180
      • Operating System:
      • Win 7 x64
      • Monitor(s):
      • Dell U2311, Dell 2005FPW
      • Internet:
      • VM 30Mb
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMagician
    This hasn't been the case since AT style powersupplies.
    AFAIK, the power switches in todays ATX cases only 'make' the connection whilst your pressing them in. The motherboard takes closing of the circuit as an instruction to 'do something'.

    What the power switch actually does depends on the current state of the PC, and ACPI/Power Management settings.


    HTH,
    S.
    100% correct .

    Can't remember the correct term, but it's something like a "Push to Make" switch that you'll want.

    Maplin, and 10000000000s of other places stock varieties of said switches: http://www.maplin.co.uk/searchtempla...TON%20SWITCHES

    HTH
    http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/switch.htm - 2nd one down the list of standard switches
    Quote Originally Posted by Noni
    What the hell does "WTH" mean


  6. #6
    awm
    awm is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    US
    Posts
    920
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked
    7 times in 7 posts
    At least in the US the terms are normally open (NO) and normally cloased(NC). Abbreviations are what you might see in a catalog. I believe you want a NC (Usually the pins are electricly connected).

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    W Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,668
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked
    13 times in 11 posts
    That's great FatalSaviour, Cheers!

  8. #8
    Senior Member FatalSaviour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London/Oxford/York
    Posts
    1,876
    Thanks
    42
    Thanked
    12 times in 11 posts
    • FatalSaviour's system
      • Motherboard:
      • MSI P55-GD80
      • CPU:
      • Intel Core i7 860
      • Memory:
      • 4x2GB GEiL PC17000
      • Storage:
      • 3x1000GB, 2x500GB (RAID1), 1x2TB
      • Graphics card(s):
      • GTX 470
      • PSU:
      • Corsair HX700
      • Case:
      • Antec P180
      • Operating System:
      • Win 7 x64
      • Monitor(s):
      • Dell U2311, Dell 2005FPW
      • Internet:
      • VM 30Mb
    Quote Originally Posted by awm
    At least in the US the terms are normally open (NO) and normally cloased(NC). Abbreviations are what you might see in a catalog. I believe you want a NC (Usually the pins are electricly connected).
    Think it would be a Normally Open switch for an ATX system surely (if the pins are not connected during normal operation?)
    And no problem XA
    Quote Originally Posted by Noni
    What the hell does "WTH" mean


  9. #9
    Senior Member oshta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Uttoxeter
    Posts
    1,405
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    0 times in 0 posts
    Yeah, there just "push-to-make" switches.
    - And as the other have said, a quick push will shut down the OS, and a 5sec hold with cut the power.


    Daniel

  10. #10
    Treasure Hunter extraordinaire herulach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Bolton
    Posts
    5,618
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked
    172 times in 159 posts
    • herulach's system
      • Motherboard:
      • MSI Z97 MPower
      • CPU:
      • i7 4790K
      • Memory:
      • 8GB Vengeance LP
      • Storage:
      • 1TB WD Blue + 250GB 840 EVo
      • Graphics card(s):
      • 2* Palit GTX 970 Jetstream
      • PSU:
      • EVGA Supernova G2 850W
      • Case:
      • CM HAF Stacker 935, 2*360 Rad WC Loop w/EK blocks.
      • Operating System:
      • Windows 8.1
      • Monitor(s):
      • Crossover 290HD & LG L1980Q
      • Internet:
      • 120mb Virgin Media
    look on rswww.com at their piezo switches (theyre in automation strangely enough) they ar quite frankly the pimpiest thing ever.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Intel Q&A: Homework for motherboard makers
    By Steve in forum HEXUS News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-04-2005, 07:08 PM
  2. Gizmo making help wanted
    By daveham in forum PC Hardware and Components
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 18-05-2004, 11:41 AM
  3. I'm not able to switch on my PC :-((
    By Oliver in forum PC Hardware and Components
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 17-11-2003, 12:15 AM
  4. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-10-2003, 04:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •