Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: HEXUS.reviews :: Akasa vs FSP - 500W PSU shootout

  1. #1
    Team HEXUS.net
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,345
    Thanks
    61
    Thanked
    348 times in 193 posts

    HEXUS.reviews :: Akasa vs FSP - 500W PSU shootout

    Although the PSU is probably the most important component in your system, it's all too often neglected. We take a look at two 500W PSUs with competitive pricing and attractive features - one from Akasa, the other from FSP.

    Find out more.
    Last edited by Bob Crabtree; 02-04-2007 at 05:34 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Andrzej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    621
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    4 times in 3 posts
    I am a bit confused about the testing - I must be missing something

    The same power enters both units

    The Akasa is more efficient (i.e. more power is 'throughput' than with the FSP)...

    ...but when you compare the temperatures before/after load...

    ...the Akasa gets almost 4 degrees hotter

    My imagination - or this does not (quite) make sense ?


    If only there were a highly qualified accountant in the house - so that we could get a certified tally on the Watts

  3. #3
    Banhammer in peace PeterB kalniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    29,781
    Thanks
    1,608
    Thanked
    3,036 times in 2,465 posts
    • kalniel's system
      • Motherboard:
      • Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Ultra
      • CPU:
      • Intel i9 9900k
      • Memory:
      • 32GB DDR4 3200 CL16
      • Storage:
      • 1TB Samsung 970Evo+ NVMe
      • Graphics card(s):
      • nVidia GTX 1060 6GB
      • PSU:
      • Seasonic 600W
      • Case:
      • Cooler Master HAF 912
      • Operating System:
      • Win 10 Pro x64
      • Monitor(s):
      • Dell U2311H
      • Internet:
      • rubbish
    It just means it's more efficient at the maximum draw. If efficiency at mid-draw is worse then more heat could be produced.

    Interesting comments about the load sharing on the rails - it seems to have taken some manufacturers a while to get away from the idea of super power hungry CPUs. But then again there is the arguement for 'clean power' and by keeping everything on a seperate rail from the CPU they might be gaining stability - could explain the lack of ripple compared to the unit which puts the second PEG on the same rail as the CPU.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked
    1 time in 1 post
    • DeSean's system
      • Motherboard:
      • ASUS P5K Premium Wifi/AP
      • CPU:
      • Intel Q6600 B3 @ 2400Mhz
      • Memory:
      • Corsair Dominator PC2-8500 2x2048MB
      • Storage:
      • Raptor 36GB, MaXLine III 2x250GB, HD501J 2x500GB
      • Graphics card(s):
      • BFG 8800GTS OC 320MB
      • PSU:
      • Silverstone Zeus ST75ZF
      • Case:
      • Silverstone TJ-09
      • Operating System:
      • Vista Ultimate x64
      • Monitor(s):
      • Samsung 225MW
      • Internet:
      • Virgin 10Mb
    Probably the most important component in your system but often neglected
    Hehe I thought we had seen the last of that phrase at the start of PSU reviews... I think everyone who is involved in computers now is well aware of their PSU choice.

    I found you statement about Radeon X1950XTX a little alarming. You meant single card rather than Crossfire yes? I can't imagine hooking up two expensive cards as well as my entire system to a 500W PSU.

  5. #5
    Senior Member this_is_gav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,846
    Thanks
    175
    Thanked
    254 times in 216 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DeSean View Post
    Hehe I thought we had seen the last of that phrase at the start of PSU reviews... I think everyone who is involved in computers now is well aware of their PSU choice..
    Looking in the Hexus.Hardstuff section, you may be surprised at how many are anything but aware of it

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,028
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked
    34 times in 29 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DeSean View Post
    Hehe I thought we had seen the last of that phrase at the start of PSU reviews... I think everyone who is involved in computers now is well aware of their PSU choice.

    I found you statement about Radeon X1950XTX a little alarming. You meant single card rather than Crossfire yes? I can't imagine hooking up two expensive cards as well as my entire system to a 500W PSU.
    I think you'd be surprised what can be run by a high quality PSU.

    Alot of the power requirements are over exaggerated by the PSU companies - the inquirer ran a quad core, 8800gtx SLI system on a 500W psu easily without problems

    http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=36066

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,536
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked
    4 times in 3 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by YorkieBen View Post
    I think you'd be surprised what can be run by a high quality PSU.

    Alot of the power requirements are over exaggerated by the PSU companies - the inquirer ran a quad core, 8800gtx SLI system on a 500W psu easily without problems

    http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=36066
    I admit at the off that I'm no expert on PSUs.

    So, I personally don't know how to accurately define what wattage PSU is required in any particular configuration - but I have little doubt that James, Tarinder, Paul D and number of other HEXITES do. Hopefully, someone will be along to comment.

    What I do know, from bitter experience, is that if you use an inadequate power supply, then you get all sorts of problems with how the system runs.

    Here, on my main PC, I tend to have three or four internal hard disk drives, plus two internal DVD burners, and a whole lot of stuff hanging off the machine from USB and FireWire ports - and some of those ports are delivering power.

    I say all this because I was less than satisfied reading that Inquirer piece when I realised that what doesn't seem to have been provided is any proper detail of what's inside the PC or what the total power-requirement of its various elements is (apologies if, somehow, I've missed this).

    For instance, we're not informed, it seems, even about how many HDDs or optical drives are in the PC to which the article's eye-catching headline refers.

    All we get is this (my itals):
    ...add the usual hard disks, DVD and, well, cool the CPU with some watery stuff so that it doesn't get really hot when fragging enemy soldiers or compressing those HD DVDs and you have the ultimate Xmas 2006 PC present.
    However, I do agree with general theme of what you're saying and that a lower-rated but high-quality PSU is a better option than a higher-rated but lower-quality model.

    I also think that there is a lot in what you say about power requirements being exaggerated but it's more than anything the graphics-card companies that do this, as a lazy way out - instead of saying, get a good quality unit of this rating, they state a higher rating in the expectation that a lot of people will buy cheapo PSUs.

    As for the idea of saving energy by having a lower-rated PSU - which is something that Inquirer piece also discusses, well, I don't know if that would actually make a lot of difference, since I'm not even sure whether a PSU always consumes electricity according to the wattage it's rated at or whether, in fact, it only consumes according to what's being asked of it from the PC and its various components.

    But if you want to take power saving seriously, there are many diverse strategies you can use, starting, I'd suggest, with one or more power-saving multi-way socket adaptors from OneClick.

    One of these will ensure that when you turn off your PC, you also turn off all the power to the external peripherals (including monitor), many of which use inline or plug-mounted power adaptors that would otherwise be using power (and wearing out) around the clock.

    I don't think it would be unusual to have five of these adaptors clustered around a single PC for:

    * Speakers
    * Broadband modem
    * Printer
    * External HDD
    * External DVD burner

    But, here, though, I actually have additional devices powered from such external mains-adaptors:

    * Wireless router
    * Gigabit switch
    * Two further external HDDs
    * One further printer
    * Skype USB telephone adaptor
    * Powered USB hub
    * Powered FireWire hub
    * Old-style modem (in case broadband goes down)
    * DV VCR
    * DV camcorder
    * Analogue<>DV converter box
    * Other stuff that comes and goes
    Last edited by Bob Crabtree; 02-04-2007 at 06:41 PM. Reason: Add the point about good vs bad PSUs

  8. #8
    Manager of Performance Analysis
    HEXUS.labs
    JARSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    8 times in 2 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Bania View Post
    I am a bit confused about the testing - I must be missing something
    Hmmm, is it possible a similar kind of confusion might be affecting ATI's engineers, hence the delay on R600

    Although they have very similar efficiency figures, the layout and hence cooling inside each PSU are likely to be somewhat different. In addition, the FSP is possibly running its fan slightly faster, as suggested at the bottom of that same page in our review.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeSean View Post
    I found you statement about Radeon X1950XTX a little alarming. You meant single card rather than Crossfire yes? I can't imagine hooking up two expensive cards as well as my entire system to a 500W PSU.
    Our original statement about running Dual X1950 XTX's and 7900GTX's being fine on a 500W PSU, is based upon our own watt meter readings; whilst testing complete systems such as the Mesh Elite Fire X1950, in addition to running SLI and CROSSFIRE configurations whilst testing graphics cards and motherboards.

    In these circumstances we have seen that the entire system is usually only pulling 300-390W depending on CPU used (Dual-core or Quad-core).

    Quote Originally Posted by YorkieBen View Post
    I think you'd be surprised what can be run by a high quality PSU.

    Alot of the power requirements are over exaggerated by the PSU companies - the inquirer ran a quad core, 8800gtx SLI system on a 500W psu easily without problems http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=36066
    As Bob helpfully pointed out, it's not necessarily the PSU manufacturers that are claiming you need these ridiculously high wattage PSU's, but more recently the VGA guys adopting a cover-all policy to account for cheap-ass supplies that don't deliver what they say on the tin.

    Like Bob, I'm concerned that the INQ article might give people the wrong impression that they can happily run an SLI 8800GTX setup on a 500W PSU. Although it may run fine for a while, it's likely to be unstable during the summer due to elevated ambient temperature's (unless it's rated @ 50 degrees Celsius for continuous operation. Most aren't), and won't last anywhere near as long as a setup which is only using 80% of the capacity during peak-load.

    Therefore using a high-quality correctly rated supply at no more than 80% of its rated capacity is what we recommend.

    For example A top-end Dual/Quad-core Intel or AMD CPU system with 2-3 hard-drives (depending on make/model and capacity), and at least one optical drive; with two 8800GTX's running in SLI, would easily exceed 80% of the capacity of a good-quality 500W supply during peak-load.
    Last edited by PD HEXUS; 05-04-2007 at 02:45 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Akasa PSU not standard ATX size...??
    By pawhe in forum SCAN.care@HEXUS
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-10-2006, 09:07 PM
  2. Silverstone 0dB Fanless PSU
    By Carvahlo in forum Reader Reviews
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-10-2004, 09:12 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •