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Thread: Memory Heat Spreder opinion

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    Lightbulb Memory Heat Spreader opinion

    What do you guys make of this as a heat spreading solution for cooling two sticks of 512Mb PC3200 Memory running in dual channel?

    http://www.overclock.co.uk/customer/...cat=258&page=2

    Is it a good cooling solution? Is it even worth it? The sticks have no heat dissapation system at the moment.

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    Last edited by yamangman; 10-08-2004 at 02:36 PM.
    To err is human. To really foul things up ... you need a computer.

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    • Captain Fizz's system
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    TBH, I tried heat spreaders on my old memory and didn't get even 1MHz increase.

    Not the best of memory but the mobo was an nF2 so the mobo wasn't an issue.

    The best thing about them is how easy they make the memory to handle compared to bare PCB's. And it looks better.

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    Well, heatspreaders on RAM modules has been one of those long debated issues. After many years of modules with them (Corsair stuff, mainly) I'm now using DDR500 modules that don't have them (Kingmax). In my well-cooled case, I haven't noticed the slightest difference. In a less well cooled case where the memory temperature was marginal, they *might* make a difference; but it's a big 'might'.

    I guess the other thing that I've seen a lot of is heatspreaders that have been poorly fitted and/or have no decent thermal compound between them and the underlying chips - which kinda makes the whole heatspreader idea redundant.

    Still, they are cheap, and if you are going to fit them properly with some nice contact across *all* the chips and use some decent thermal paste they may be worth a try. Me, I don't need or use them (and I one of the skeptics over them anyway...) So ask yourself: do I really need them?

    Nomadd

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    (Trying to remember the discussions had previously on another forum: )

    RAM is capacitor based, unlike CPU's which are transistor based. As such cooling them down a bit won't let you get them any faster. However, it will enable you to put a bit more voltage through and hopefully not kill the things, as such facilitating a greater overclock.

    Ramsinks on a graphics card's memory are pretty much the same, but they help remove heat from the entire card, and as such can help overclocking that way.
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    They are there for prettyness and for protection of the modules, dont buy for perfromance.

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    I suppose they could help to keep a system more stable if you put a higher voltage through 'em, they are quite cheap so I might get them.

    Do you think they could extend a memory banks life?

    I dunno what you mean by capacitor based though, I should imagine there are an equal number of transistors and capacitors on each wafer, one capacitor storing the one bit for each transistor.
    To err is human. To really foul things up ... you need a computer.

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    I'm no RAM expert, but the very reason it loses its data when there's a loss of power is because of its capacitor based nature. Capacitance is used to store the data, and as such the RAM has to constantly be "refreshed."

    If we go any further I'll be way out of my depth...
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    You're exactly right, but a capacitor cannot just say 'im on' or 'im off'. Each capacitor must be linked with a transistor - forming a memory cell - the transistor changes the state of the capcitor, 1 or 0, and also tells the circuitry of the RAM if it can read the bit in the capacitor, 1 or 0, or more sensibly, true or false or yes or no.

    Ima learns ya
    To err is human. To really foul things up ... you need a computer.

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    Right, thanks! I think the point of all this is that memory is different to a processor, and as such is affected differently by heat.
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    STR rules

    As for the heatsinks, dont bother. A well placed fan will make much more difference than those.
    Quote Originally Posted by Saracen View Post
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    True, especially the memory cache on processors, which is comprised of nothing but transistors, with (eight, I think) comprising each memory cell, instead of storing bits in transistors, they use boolean logic gates to read and write bits.
    To err is human. To really foul things up ... you need a computer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent
    STR rules

    As for the heatsinks, dont bother. A well placed fan will make much more difference than those.
    You mean a case fan? I have two exhaust fans at the moment, and with my processor overclocked, its started reaching upto 57 degrees under full load, I think it's quite dusty in there, can you recommend anything else to get my system a bit cooler?
    To err is human. To really foul things up ... you need a computer.

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    re: "I'm no RAM expert, but the very reason it loses its data when there's a loss of power is because of its capacitor based nature. Capacitance is used to store the data, and as such the RAM has to constantly be "refreshed."

    But then a CPU loses it's data when you switch it off, and modern CPUs have quite large caches (i.e RAM) on them, so I think the two (CPU and RAM) are a lot closer in their electrical characteristics than meets the eye...

    From Britannica: "In a DRAM chip, each memory cell consists of a capacitor (rather than a flip-flop) and a single transistor. When a capacitor is electrically charged, it is said to store the binary digit 1, and when discharged, it represents 0; these changes are controlled by the transistor."

    So I think it's a hybrid technology, really.

    Still, I think you are right: the major reason Corsair, et.al. add them (apart from them looking pretty) is so they can overvolt the RAM they sell you, thus claiming the bogus ratings they quote! As I said, I'm a complete skeptic when it comes to 'performance RAM at v.silly prices' these days. :-)

    Nomadd

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    See my post above nomadd . Static RAM (CPU cache) is an entirely different plate-o-chips
    To err is human. To really foul things up ... you need a computer.

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    re: "See my post above nomadd"

    Yep, you must have been typing the same time as me. Saw yours after I'd hit post! :-)

    Nomadd

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    Quote Originally Posted by yamangman
    You mean a case fan? I have two exhaust fans at the moment, and with my processor overclocked, its started reaching upto 57 degrees under full load, I think it's quite dusty in there, can you recommend anything else to get my system a bit cooler?
    Either one in the case directly over the RAM, or one to help airflow around the RAM in general (seems to be often neglected for some reason !)
    Quote Originally Posted by Saracen View Post
    And by trying to force me to like small pants, they've alienated me.

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