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Thread: Gigabyte bios overclocking and easytune 4

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    Question Gigabyte bios overclocking and easytune 4

    HI, I just tried upping to fsb by 2hz and the dram by 2hz in the bios (gigabyte ga-7s748-l) and when i got into windows, easy tune said my pci was at 27hz and agp was at 53hz? I reistalled Easytune4 and now it reads normal. Is it better to use the bios to overclock or easytune4. Also I don't know how to save my settings in easytune as my overclock has dissapeared by the time i next reset.Thanks.

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    Oh, and is there any way I can lock my pci and agp bus in the bios because I assume I will need to do that. Also is there any overclocking utility that lock the pci and agp bus?

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    Does anyone have any views on easy tune4?

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    In general, I don't think EasyTune is any good at all. Such that I don't even use it. Overclocking through the BIOS is definately the way to go. With regard to AGP/PCI locking, that requires support at motherboard-level. It may be implemented transparently (As on my system) or through manually-set dividers/ratios, set somewhere in the BIOS.

    In the latter case, they'll be in the form of FSB : AGP : PCI, though not strictly in that order. For a 133MHz FSB, an example could be 1:2:4 (133/1 = FSB, 133/2 = AGP's 66MHz, and 133/4 = PCI's 33MHz). Should you want to up your FSB to 200MHz, you'd then have to change the dividers to 1:3:6 (Again, 200/1 = FSB, 200/3 = AGP's 66MHz, and 200/6 = PCI's 33MHz). Having your AGP and PCI busses run too far out of spec (Too far from their default speeds of 66MHz and 33MHz, respectively) can cause components to be unstable, if they even work at all. An example is that harddrives cannot be read while the PCI bus is out of spec (The IDE bus runs off the PCI bus, so any changes to the PCI frequency affects the IDE bus).

    Good luck.

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    hmmmm, i can't find anything about dividers or pci and agp on my gigabyte ga-7s748-l. The thing is easy tune 4 allows me to stop the pci and agp going up in hz, but I knbow that the bios is the best place to overclock. I am running f5 bios which is the latest bar on (f6 obviosly) which is labelled sempron support). Would getting the new bios unlock more options in the bios. Does anyone have experience with this board and could point me in the right direction?Thanks

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    That board has a SiS chipset. I'm pretty sure you can't lock the AGP/PCI buses with it. :\
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    BIOS updates usually add additional support and features, so updating would be a good idea. In the case of your board, I notice that the F6 BIOS is relatively recent, newer by over 8 months than the F5, so updating is definately recommended. Unfortunately, I don't know your board or EasyTune very well, so I can't suggest much else. You could also try looking for a setting in the BIOS related to AGP speed, and make sure it's set to 66MHz and not Auto.

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    Ctrl+F1 in the BIOS on Gigabyte boards often displays a new menu tree for you to explore too.
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    That's true. Alternatively, it just unhides advanced settings in the various sub-sections, as it does with my board. Thanks for the reminder, Kez, had actually forgotten about that.

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    Thanks, unfortunately ctrl+f1 only allows me to adjust the ram timings i think. If i couldnt lock the agp and pci, how high do u reckon i could get my fsb from 166 up to? I have a 9800 pro in the agp.

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    It'd depend primarily on the harddrives, I think. Those would usually be the first to start acting up when overclocking with unlocked AGP & PCI clocks. However, any component, really, could cause the bottleneck. Sound card, network card, you name it.

    Have you tried Ctrl + F1 on the F6 BIOS at all? They may have included some new features there.

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    im just worried about updating the bios because i have heard of people really screwing up their pcs when updating the bios, whats the safest way of doing it?(gigabyte include a program called @bios, is that ok to use?)

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    I've used that before from windows with no problems. Some say using awardflash in dos is safer. However, I have dual bios so I can kill my bios all I like. I've messed about with mine loads and never actually killed it...
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    I'd say most screw-ups result from powering off a machine while it's flashing or rebooting after a flash. It's also possible that an error occurs while reading the image off the stiffy, if that's what you use. I personally rely on my BIOS's internal flash option (Which reads the image from a stiffy. ), and count on the dual BIOS feature to protect me from anything going wrong. I've never flashed from within Windows, don't trust it. There are a number of people that swear by that method, though.
    I've taken a look at your board, though, and it doesn't seem to have the dual BIOS feature.
    Last edited by eldren; 24-10-2004 at 08:58 PM.

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    john johnnr892's Avatar
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    it says on the back of the box that it has the dual-bios feature.Kez, do u use the 'save current bios'option first, then do an internet update?

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    Save current bios saves your current bios to a file on the machine in case you want to revert back to it.

    dual bios is a second phsyical bios that kicks in if the first one becomes corrupted. After a few days of everything being ok you can even go into the dual bios options (through the bios) and synch your backup bios with your new one - don't do that 'till you're sure all is well though.

    If that fails, you can usually still restore from a floppy disk. Quite resilient are bioses these days, particularly gigabyte's.
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