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Thread: Cool n Quiet Technology AMD 64

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    Cool n Quiet Technology AMD 64

    Can this technology only be used with the stock HSF or can I use my ThermalTake Silent Boost? (socket 754 on asus k8v-se)

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    Any HSF with the speed sensor wire (yellow) afaik. Not Molex.
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    You don't need a speed sensor at all.

    Cool and quiet isn't a fan speed regulator, it's a chip multiplier throttler that acts based on load, not temperature. When the chip isn't being fully loaded, it reduces the speed and power draw of the CPU, thus produces less heat.

    You need the correct drivers, not hardware. (so yes, it'll work fine with your ThermalTake)

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    For all the difference it makes you may as well not bother IMHO. Even the stock AMD fan isn't that loud really, you have to enable CnQ in your BIOS (which disables any overclocking/overvolting) and it's yet another bit of software on your machine which could go wrong.

    just my tuppenceworth...


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    Depends on your motherboard. Most are fine with overclocking and CnQ - overvolting is the only limitation on some boards, but that's not a limitation for moderate overclocking.

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    if you overclock with it on, you are at the mercy of whether it thinks your computer is too hot and the multi should be turned down to do you a favour

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    OK hang on, someone (possibly me) is getting confused here.

    I thought Cool n Quiet doesn't care about the temperature - it's a load based multiplier adjustment thing. IE, if your CPU is running at 100% the multiplier is set to max. However, if you are not using the full power of the CPU, it reduces the multiplier to save power, which has a knock on effect of lowering temperatures.

    If the CnQ thinks the computer is too hot it doesn't do anything at all - it's not interested in temperature, only load.

    There is *another* mechanism which is just a safety feature, which will throttleback or more likely just cut your processor if it hits a certain extreme temperature threshold, to prevent damage. This isn't related to CnQ, and would still apply whether you had CnQ on or off. This is hardcoded.

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    yeah maybe youre right

    i guess the voltage change or the fact that it might assume the chip is running at stock speed could cause problems but i doubt theyd implement it like that

    but the heat/fan speed isnt part of cool n quiet, it just happens once the chip gets cooler

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    I was under the impression that it was based on percentage load as opposed to heat output?
    Seeing as it downclocks when idle, when CPU will be coolest, basing it on heat wouldn't appear to be very clever.

    CnQ adjusts multiplier and voltage levels, to lower the clockspeed and thermal output of the CPU when it's not being used.

    Asus' Q-Fan, and other built-in fan controlling hardware on motherboard's is what adjusts fan speeds, lowering them when the CPU isn't too hot.

    HTH
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    There are 2 aspects to cool & quiet:

    1. Vcore & multiplier regulation - this drops temperatures by reducing Vcore and multiplier when on "low power" stuff like word processing, etc.

    2. Fan regulation - This is only available when the HSF has a built in thermistor. As the temperatures decrease (per item 1 above) the fan automatically slows down. It is not directly controlled by the motherboard, but indirectly so.

    As for overclocking & Cool & Quiet, I use an application called RMClock. It allows undervolting, multiplier changing and also moderate overvolting. It can be used to effectively moderate teh C&Q function on an overclocked CPU. It is much better then the standard AMD C&Q package.

    Edit: As to point 2, all of the stock AMD HSF solutions have a fan with built in thermistor. Not many aftermarket ones do though.

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    just a quick question. im using an athlon XP at the mo so take that as yo will (no actualy knowlege of the A64) but if your CPU has a built in heat sensor why the hell would you need one on your heatsink? i can control my fan off the temp of my cpu. isnt that all you need?
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    do you mean tachometer?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MadduckUK
    just a quick question. im using an athlon XP at the mo so take that as yo will (no actualy knowlege of the A64) but if your CPU has a built in heat sensor why the hell would you need one on your heatsink? i can control my fan off the temp of my cpu. isnt that all you need?
    There is no temperature sensor on your heatsink. I think you mean a fan speed sensor.
    Or you mean a temperature sensor on the motherboard and one inside the CPU?
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadduckUK
    just a quick question. im using an athlon XP at the mo so take that as yo will (no actualy knowlege of the A64) but if your CPU has a built in heat sensor why the hell would you need one on your heatsink? i can control my fan off the temp of my cpu. isnt that all you need?
    The built in thermistor (heat sensitive resistor) on the stock A64 cooler allows the fan speed to automatically change as the heatsink temperature varies. This is a far simpler way of controlling the fanspeed than manually checking the cpu temp and changing the fan speed. It is also simpler (not neccessarily better) than using a program such as speedfan.
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    I've never heard of nor seen the stock A64 coolers having thermistors, myself. Any fan speed reductions have had to be done by setting the motherboard to lower the fan speed as the temperature of the CPU reduces (or rather, increase the speed as the temp rises).

    If you don't set fan control up in the BIOS, the HSF fan just spins at its highest speed, in my experience.

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    Sorry, I was talking rubbish. I'm getting confused between one pc that has Q-Fan and another that uses a thermistor
    I blame..... scrandman
    E64@3.4GHz@1.38v or 3.72@1.51v;P5BD-Wifi;79GTO@705/800;2GigGeil800U;20"LGwide;180Gig 64kstripe + 140Gig Mirror + 200Gig single
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