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Thread: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

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    Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    Quote Originally Posted by cron410 View Post
    In my powerconnect 2724 with the same power supply, I replaced the 25v 47uf capacitor in c3 position with a 50v 47uf capacitor from an old ATX power supply. Works great now. The c1 capacitor child have also been replaced with parts from the ATX psu
    '

    I had to replace the 400V/100uF (victim of capacitor plaque) and the 25uF (the same or otherwise dead) capacitors to revive the PS. After replacing the 100uF, I got 300VDC but the oscillator wasn't running. Then I replaced the 25uF and the problem was solved.

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    Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    Please check my post on repairing the Delta ADP-40VP power supply in a Dell PowerConnect 2724. Note: the (same) power supply in a 2824 seems to have another 100uF/400V capacitor that shows no signs of capacitor plague (leaking electrolyte).
    Last edited by peterb; 28-01-2018 at 09:18 AM. Reason: Remove link

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    Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    I know all about odd PSUs that are hard to get hold of.

    Currently awaiting an order of 100 bespoke units from China. Cheaper than replacing 100 switches, but it's a massive pita to order from a Chinese manufacturer for a one off item.

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    Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    FYI, the link that one of the early posters gave to a discussion of this issue is dead. The website seems to be down. I got the text from that discussion from the webarchive, and have posted it below for future reference. It lists some replacement PSUs, and later gives the information about the C3 cap replacement.... Note that the comment in the text regarding "the mains input polarity was swapped" is not germaine. The input to this PSU is AC, and as such there is no polarity, and it doesn't matter. This is also commented on further down in the discussion.

    Here's the text of that now dead thread:
    "The switch is dead, long live the switch!
    Posted on 2011-02-15 by David
    Please take great care when working with mains power, electric shocks will hurt and can easily kill.

    How my JGS516 was revived, the verbose version:
    Last week my main network switch decided to stop working at random.

    Sadly the Netgear JGS516 was well out of its warranty so there was no chance of having it repaired by Netgear.


    You must remove two parts of the casing to gain access to the fun stuff (read: electronics); the front panel and top panel.
    The front has all the flashy bits that show your link status attached to it and two rectangular holes where the ethernet sockets protrude.

    To remove the top cover you must first remove the front cover;
    Unscrew the small black countersunk screws (4 in total)
    Left side
    Right side
    Underneath, left of centre
    Underneath, right of centre
    Gently pull the front panel away from the housing.
    Remove the three screws that attach the top panel:
    Left side, centre bottom
    Right side, centre bottom
    Top centre of the back panel (just under the lip)
    The top panel will now lift away
    Remaining are two PCB screwed to the base of the rack case. There are easily identifiable as a power supply and the magical packet shuffling part.

    The PSU has a nice label on it which clearly shows that it should be an off-the-shelf part.

    Delta Electronics INC
    Model ADP-40VP
    Input 100-240v 1.0A 50-60Hz
    Output 5v 8A DC
    With a bit of multimeter prodding, the power supply was found to be supplying about 5mV. As above this clearly is not a useful value

    But what of the switch board? Clearly it would not be worth replacing a power supply if the switch board was broken too! Maybe i can test it with my bench PSU…

    With a quick continuity test I confirmed that all the 0V pins were connected to each other as were all three of the +5v pins. (Why three pins for each? Simply the connectors are not rated to handle the full output power of the power supply on a single pin so several are used in parallel.)

    Similar testing on the switch board proved that the connectors were wired in an identical way. With this knowledge I broke out the crocodile clips and bench power supply for some testing! As this is only a short term test i can get away with just using one crocodile clip and pin on each side of the power input connector.



    Sorry my room lighting is a horrid CFL hence the yellow aura.

    Huzzah! the switch is alive!

    I wonder if I can buy a new power supply module…

    Google failed to find somewhere that would sell me a direct replacement “Delta ADP-40VP”. I was convinced that this would be an off the shelf part so I went on a search rampage through all the open frame power supplies on Farnell. Many power supplies are availible which meet the electrical specification but I wanted to put this switch back together and use it as before so the new supply would need to mount in the same way as its deceased predecessor.

    After half an hour or so of comparing measurements to diagrams in data sheets I had found my power supply! (See Farnell page here) By some fluke the connectors were in similar locations and of compatible types. (I was expecting a cable wiring job to make it connect).

    A new power supply was ordered and it arrived as expected the next day.

    Before installation a close inspection of the datasheet revealed that the mains input polarity was swapped compared to the old psu. Conveniently the crimp terminals on PSU cable are easily removed from their housing.



    To remove the terminals you need to push the wire into the housing to remove any pressure on the latch. Then place a small screwdriver under the end of the latch and lift it gently, if you lift it too far it will not spring back when you reinsert the terminal. Pull the wire out the housing. By doing this to both sides of the connector you can replace the pins with the opposite polarity. (The centre pin is not used to improve creepage and clearance on the PCB)

    You must swap these wires or bad things will happen!

    With the new power supply installed the switch runs nicely as before.

    The new power supply in its new home.

    New power supply as installed with old power supply on the bench.

    Shiny new bench PSU next to shinier, newer Amprove 37xr-a. Note the close correlation between PSU voltmeter and the multimeter, I think I can trust that display..

    I hope this post will help other people who may have suffered a similar failure in their JGS516. If you need any hints or think I have forgotten something please leave a comment.

    This entry was posted in Electronics, Repair. Bookmark the permalink.
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    26 Responses to The switch is dead, long live the switch!
    Milton says:
    2011-02-18 at 11:31
    Hi David,

    We have just had our Dell PowerConnect 2724 power supply blow up as well, and guess what? Same power supply as your Netgear! (and, based on your photos, same chips & board layout & same …). We are going to follow your incredibly-handy instructions to fix our switch too, so thanks for going into such detail.

    I have just one question: the polarity of our existing switch setup seems to match the polarity you have swapped _to_. We have checked the farnell datasheet, and our black-live cable is hooked up to the L port on their wiring diagram (well, it will be when the new p.s. arrives) without swapping. So, from that point of view, it looks like everything is as it should be without swapping ours over. However, given that you had to, and our switches & part numbers seem identical, I’m a bit suspicious that I’ve got it wrong somehow.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks,
    Milton.

    Reply
    David says:
    2011-02-23 at 13:01
    I took my reference for live and neutral from the labels on the plastic moulding of the IEC320-C14 connector.
    I would assume that yes if you have the same psu as i did to start with and are intending to change to the one i found on farnell it makes sense that you shoudl swap mains polarity.
    Don’t trust the cable colours!

    Reply
    David says:
    2011-02-23 at 16:25
    Also iirc on the delta PSU the pin for live is marked on the PCB.

    Reply
    Froo says:
    2011-03-01 at 00:18
    It doesn’t matter how you couple the mains pins. “the mains input polarity” — there is no polarity to care about here. In the rest of Europe this very unit is of course sold with europlugs (which can be inserted in two ways so live/neutral doesn’t matter) and the unit is constructed accordingly, and poses no safety hazard.

    Reply
    Geoff says:
    2011-03-17 at 11:54
    I’m very glad to have found this page as I have just replaced the dead power supply board in my switch with the one recommended here from Farnell (ARTESYN – NLP40-7605J). My switch is a Allied Telesyn AT-GS916GB and it now lives again :-)

    Reply
    David says:
    2011-03-21 at 21:53
    Long Live the Switch!

    Reply
    Kevin says:
    2011-04-22 at 03:45
    I found a direct replacement power supply for my Dell Switch. Here in the U.S.A. it can be purchased at Power Sources Unlimited, INC. It was about $70 after shipping but still cheaper than a new switch. The part number is SRP-40A-1002. Go online to see the specs to verify it works for your switch. It did for mine!

    Reply
    Del says:
    2011-05-07 at 20:50
    So Kevin, if I understand correctly, just plug in the cables without making any mods like David, correct? Just want to make sure.

    Reply
    Daniel says:
    2011-07-13 at 05:44
    Thanks for the information. Nice page and very clear. I have the same switch with the same problem. I found the power supply in the USA at cypower.com /Products/astec-emerson/power-supply/ac-dc/Open-EnclosedFrame/nlp40-7605j. I will order it and hopefully it solves my problem too.

    Reply
    Trevor Pogson says:
    2011-08-07 at 17:57
    Great help and advice, ordered my new psu from Farnell today – Sunday, so sadly will not arrive until Tuesday – fingers crossed it all works – I did try the same trick and ran the JGS516 from my bench PSU and the pwr LED came on, so have concluded that the PSU is dead.

    Reply
    Trevor Pogson says:
    2011-08-09 at 16:50
    New psu arrived today, fitted, works perfectly – Thank you again, saved me buying a new switch.

    The psu is also available from RS Components if Farnell are out of stock – just type or paste the psu part number into the search box.

    Reply
    Cyril says:
    2011-10-05 at 20:53
    About my PSU, the C3 capacitor (47µF 50V) was dead (32µF and a very high ESR) resulting in no oscillation of the pwm controller (UC3843B).

    sometimes, the pwm controller if failing, you just have to change it. (8-SOP package)

    Reply
    Stefano says:
    2011-10-30 at 10:33
    Thank you Cyril,
    after replacing C3 capacitor (47uF/25V) the psu works perfectly!

    Reply
    Warren says:
    2011-12-03 at 14:33
    Thanks Cyril,
    after replacing C3 capacitor (47uF/25V) the switch works fine.

    Reply
    Cyberdude says:
    2012-02-10 at 11:51
    Thanks. Replacing the C3 capacitor did the trick for me too. Works like a charm.

    Reply
    winampdevil says:
    2012-07-05 at 09:30
    Thanks a lot! C3 was dead….

    Ron says:
    2012-11-25 at 21:20
    I have a Dell Power Connect 2616, that died suddenly as well. with this same power supply. I replace C3 with a 47uF/35V cap I got at a local Radio Shack for under $2. Unit now works as new.
    Thank you all, you save me $$$ when I had very few to spend.

    Luciano Lingnau says:
    2012-05-30 at 21:08
    Thank you so much. Just got my Dell PowerConnect 2716 back to life thanks yo your tip.

    Reply
    Grubs says:
    2012-09-04 at 03:10
    Fantastic Cyril. Just replaced C3 capacitor (47uF/25V) in the PSU of my Dell PowerConnect 2716. Same as the switch in this article with ADP-40VP PSU.

    Thanks David for the original article and thanks to all the other responders indicating the C3 capacitor replacement brought theirs back to life. Got to love a 30c fix.

    Reply
    frank martis says:
    2011-10-24 at 16:30
    Thank you so much my JGS516 is up and running again thank to you.
    Brgs,

    F. Martis

    Reply
    Artak says:
    2011-11-09 at 10:19
    Thanks for useful article. I have had 2 JGS516-s and both are back to life now.
    Only thing is …
    the PSU iv’e bought same PSU but from RS had right polarity so I haven’t change anything. But its exact the same PSU. Have I done wrong?
    Thanks

    Reply
    Aaron Mason says:
    2012-05-07 at 04:54
    Hey,

    I revived an old Dell PowerConnect 2724 using this guide – it’s the first page that comes up when you Google the old PSU’s part number now. Best $98 I ever spent, that switch is now humming happily away in my home lab.

    I, too, found that the polarity was already set to the way you had to set it, but it seems to not have affected anything. Those of you reviving such hardware, take heart, you’ll be fine.

    Thanks again!

    Reply
    Michael says:
    2012-06-18 at 16:17
    So pleased to find this article, many thanks indeed.
    I was about to order a new switch to replace my JGS516 but decided to open it up to have a look first. Having established the PSU was dead, searching for ADP-40VP brought up this page.
    To save time I have ordered a new PSU from RS, but my curiosity is now making me attempt the C3 fix on the PSU anyway, fingers crossed
    Thank again.

    Reply
    Bart says:
    2012-08-31 at 17:26
    Had the same issue : PSU suddenly died. I found it great to find this info. Bought a new one (Artesyn NLP40-7605J) from RS Components and happy to see that after just plugging it the new PSU my PowerConnect 2716 is up and running again :-)
    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
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    Pyropetepete says:
    2012-09-25 at 09:48
    I just bought a Dell poweredge 2724 off ebay for £10 delivered. What a deal! Soon as she opened i cracked her open and the PSU was a nice shade of black. I’ve just ordered the PSU off Farnells for 340 delivered. I will report back

    Reply"

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    rs4847 (16-07-2018)

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    Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    I have approved this odd reply because it's actually potentially useful if someone is looking for this info

    it was caught in the spam filter, as it's a large cut and paste and on a very old subject but we're grateful for the effort the poster put in. Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Advice Trinity by Knoxville
    "The second you aren't paying attention to the tool you're using, it will take your fingers from you. It does not know sympathy." |
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    Thumbs up Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    Indeed thanks to phreich for the effort.

    I am glad to see this thread is still helping people out after 6 years.

    After 6 years of 24/7 use the Artesyn NLP40-7605J PSU replacement is still working just fine in my switch.

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    Re: Dell PowerConnect 2716 dead PSU

    Quote Originally Posted by rs4847 View Post
    Indeed thanks to phreich for the effort.

    I am glad to see this thread is still helping people out after 6 years.

    After 6 years of 24/7 use the Artesyn NLP40-7605J PSU replacement is still working just fine in my switch.
    My pleasure to be of assistance! I thought the information from that older thread might be helpful to some that might want to replace rather than repair the PSU board. BTW, I found some open frame 5Volt, 40Watt PSUs available on Ebay for as little as $15 including S&H. Most were in the $30-$60 range. I opted to try to repair the existing PSU first.

    I like many others was able to resurrect my Dell PowerConnect 2716 managed switch by replacing the weak 47uf capacitor labeled "C3" on the power supply board. It's an easy fix, and good quality 47uf 50Volt 105 degrees Centigrade rated capacitors are available on Ebay -- for very little money. I got lucky and this was the only cap I had to replace, and the large one on the board shows no sign of leakage, but if it dies down the road, it won't be any harder to replace. In my situation, the fuse on the board had not blown -- probably because it wasn't the large "C1" labeled cap that had failed -- just the C3 cap.

    In my case, I found a 10 pack of surplus Panasonic (much better quality than the Chinese ones they used to build the PSU with) for $1.00 plus $2.65 shipping. The original one was only rated for 20Volts and I recall 90 degrees C.

    By putting one in with a higher voltage and higher temperature rating, it should last much longer. These were exactly the same size as the original ones, so it was an easy unsolder/resolder job with a solder sucker and some solder wick. Probably the trickiest challenge was cutting through the copious amounts of white thermal set glue they used to affix the components together to keep them from vibrating. I used a hot glue gun to re-affix them after replacement (I only freed up the large capacitor and the small 47uf capacitor they had glued together).

    As others have mentioned before -- you just need to make sure that you note the polarity orientation of the original capacitor (the negative lead is marked with a large wide arrow on the side of the capacitor), and put the new one in with the negative lead in the same orientation as the original one.

    Thanks again to all who came before me with the information on curing this PSU's ills.

    Philip

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